Pediatricians’ Attitudes and Practices Regarding Patient Immunization in Arizona

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/221292
Title:
Pediatricians’ Attitudes and Practices Regarding Patient Immunization in Arizona
Author:
Khan, Soofia
Affiliation:
The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix
Issue Date:
30-Apr-2012
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2012 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Background: Despite the widespread availability of vaccines, including to the uninsured, significant numbers of both children and adults, remain unvaccinated or undervaccinated. Many reasons, including an increasing financial burden on primary care practices, availability of access to healthcare, and beliefs regarding vaccine safety, have been implicated; however, increasing concern has arisen regarding insurance payments for vaccines to providers [2, 5, 8]. Due to these concerns, we conducted a survey to understand the attitudes, perceptions and practices of Arizona pediatricians regarding vaccines and their reimbursement by insurance companies. Methods: In February 2011, 1407 standardized surveys were emailed, 87 surveys were faxed, and 216 surveys were mailed to AZ pediatricians who were listed in the Arizona Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics membership database. Results: From the 138 (9.0% response rate) responses, we identified that about half of all provider respondents refer insured and uninsured 5 patients to public health or other outside clinics for vaccines. The most common reason for outside patient referral for vaccine is inadequate reimbursement by insurance companies, and approximately one-third of providers did not vaccinate a patient due to inadequate reimbursement. Additionally, the vast majority of providers were interested in participating in a buying group run by TAPI. Conclusions: Based on our survey, inadequate reimbursement for vaccines by insurance companies negatively affects Arizona pediatricians’ provision of immunizations. A provider buying group coordinated by a not for profit immunization coalition is one possible solution for this problem.
Keywords:
Pediatricians
MeSH Subjects:
Immunization; Arizona
Description:
A Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.
Mentor:
Sunenshine, Rebecca, MD

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titlePediatricians’ Attitudes and Practices Regarding Patient Immunization in Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.authorKhan, Soofiaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen_US
dc.date.issued2012-04-30-
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2012 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.description.abstractBackground: Despite the widespread availability of vaccines, including to the uninsured, significant numbers of both children and adults, remain unvaccinated or undervaccinated. Many reasons, including an increasing financial burden on primary care practices, availability of access to healthcare, and beliefs regarding vaccine safety, have been implicated; however, increasing concern has arisen regarding insurance payments for vaccines to providers [2, 5, 8]. Due to these concerns, we conducted a survey to understand the attitudes, perceptions and practices of Arizona pediatricians regarding vaccines and their reimbursement by insurance companies. Methods: In February 2011, 1407 standardized surveys were emailed, 87 surveys were faxed, and 216 surveys were mailed to AZ pediatricians who were listed in the Arizona Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics membership database. Results: From the 138 (9.0% response rate) responses, we identified that about half of all provider respondents refer insured and uninsured 5 patients to public health or other outside clinics for vaccines. The most common reason for outside patient referral for vaccine is inadequate reimbursement by insurance companies, and approximately one-third of providers did not vaccinate a patient due to inadequate reimbursement. Additionally, the vast majority of providers were interested in participating in a buying group run by TAPI. Conclusions: Based on our survey, inadequate reimbursement for vaccines by insurance companies negatively affects Arizona pediatricians’ provision of immunizations. A provider buying group coordinated by a not for profit immunization coalition is one possible solution for this problem.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.subjectPediatriciansen_US
dc.subject.meshImmunizationen_US
dc.subject.meshArizonaen_US
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorSunenshine, Rebecca, MDen_US
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