Defining 1H-MRS Criteria Used to Differentiate Brain Tumor from Radiation Necrosis

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/221273
Title:
Defining 1H-MRS Criteria Used to Differentiate Brain Tumor from Radiation Necrosis
Author:
Crain, Ian
Affiliation:
The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix
Issue Date:
30-Apr-2012
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2012 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
An effective modality for differentiating recurrent brain tumor from post-treatment radiation effect remains elusive. The average survival time after diagnosis of high grade brain tumors is one year. It is imperative to maximize currently available interventions to increase survival. One potential imaging technique to differentiate tumor recurrence from treatment effect is 1H-MRS. It is currently unknown how this imaging modality performs this task in the clinical setting. This study presents a variety of cases that represent the spectrum of 1H-MRS use, interpretation, and outcomes of patients with gliomas at a high volume tertiary treatment facility. The state of 1H-MRS use for differentiating tumor recurrence from radiation necrosis demonstrates a need for better techniques and criteria for interpretation of acquired 1H-MRS information.
MeSH Subjects:
Neoplasms, brain; Necrosis
Description:
A Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.
Mentor:
Preul, Mark, MD

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleDefining 1H-MRS Criteria Used to Differentiate Brain Tumor from Radiation Necrosisen_US
dc.contributor.authorCrain, Ianen_US
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen_US
dc.date.issued2012-04-30-
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2012 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.description.abstractAn effective modality for differentiating recurrent brain tumor from post-treatment radiation effect remains elusive. The average survival time after diagnosis of high grade brain tumors is one year. It is imperative to maximize currently available interventions to increase survival. One potential imaging technique to differentiate tumor recurrence from treatment effect is 1H-MRS. It is currently unknown how this imaging modality performs this task in the clinical setting. This study presents a variety of cases that represent the spectrum of 1H-MRS use, interpretation, and outcomes of patients with gliomas at a high volume tertiary treatment facility. The state of 1H-MRS use for differentiating tumor recurrence from radiation necrosis demonstrates a need for better techniques and criteria for interpretation of acquired 1H-MRS information.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms, brainen_US
dc.subject.meshNecrosisen_US
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorPreul, Mark, MDen_US
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