Doctoring and Disabilities: Analyzing the Implementation of a Disabilities-focused Clinical Skills Program for Second-year Medical Students

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/221242
Title:
Doctoring and Disabilities: Analyzing the Implementation of a Disabilities-focused Clinical Skills Program for Second-year Medical Students
Author:
Churgin, Daniel
Affiliation:
The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix
Issue Date:
30-Apr-2012
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2012 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Objectives: To investigate second-year medical students’ change in comfort level after a disabilities-focused interactive session, with regards to disability etiquette and greeting, interviewing, and examining patients with disabilities. Setting: The University of Arizona College of Medicine, Phoenix Campus, doctoring suites. Students interacted in a clinical setting with volunteers with disabilities, including volunteers with blindness, deafness, mobility impairment, and language impairment. Students received 3 surveys during the study duration: the first before the event, the second after they had prepared for the event with didactic materials, and the third after the event. Participants: 46 second-year medical students participated in the event, and 29 students completed all surveys. Methods: Survey data was analyzed using paired t-tests wherever possible, with P <0.05 being interpreted as significant. Results: Comfort level for disability etiquette and greeting, interviewing, and examining patients with disabilities improved significantly for patients with blindness, deafness, mobility impairment, and language impairment. Although this change was significant for most measures from pre-event to post-event, it was significant for every measure from post-materials to post-event. Conclusion: A pre-clinical disabilities event in which second-year medical students interact with people with disabilities is effective in increasing student comfort level.
Keywords:
Doctoring; Disabilities
MeSH Subjects:
Disabled Persons; Clinical Competence; Students, Medical
Description:
A Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.; Objectives: To investigate second-year medical students’ change in comfort level after a disabilities-focused interactive session, with regards to disability etiquette and greeting, interviewing, and examining patients with disabilities. Setting: The University of Arizona College of Medicine, Phoenix Campus, doctoring suites. Students interacted in a clinical setting with volunteers with disabilities, including volunteers with blindness, deafness, mobility impairment, and language impairment. Students received 3 surveys during the study duration: the first before the event, the second after they had prepared for the event with didactic materials, and the third after the event. Participants: 46 second-year medical students participated in the event, and 29 students completed all surveys. Methods: Survey data was analyzed using paired t-tests wherever possible, with P <0.05 being interpreted as significant. 5 Results: Comfort level for disability etiquette and greeting, interviewing, and examining patients with disabilities improved significantly for patients with blindness, deafness, mobility impairment, and language impairment. Although this change was significant for most measures from pre-event to post-event, it was significant for every measure from post-materials to post-event. Conclusion: A pre-clinical disabilities event in which second-year medical students interact with people with disabilities is effective in increasing student comfort level.
Mentor:
Campagnolo, Denise, MD, MS

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleDoctoring and Disabilities: Analyzing the Implementation of a Disabilities-focused Clinical Skills Program for Second-year Medical Studentsen_US
dc.contributor.authorChurgin, Danielen_US
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen_US
dc.date.issued2012-04-30-
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2012 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To investigate second-year medical students’ change in comfort level after a disabilities-focused interactive session, with regards to disability etiquette and greeting, interviewing, and examining patients with disabilities. Setting: The University of Arizona College of Medicine, Phoenix Campus, doctoring suites. Students interacted in a clinical setting with volunteers with disabilities, including volunteers with blindness, deafness, mobility impairment, and language impairment. Students received 3 surveys during the study duration: the first before the event, the second after they had prepared for the event with didactic materials, and the third after the event. Participants: 46 second-year medical students participated in the event, and 29 students completed all surveys. Methods: Survey data was analyzed using paired t-tests wherever possible, with P <0.05 being interpreted as significant. Results: Comfort level for disability etiquette and greeting, interviewing, and examining patients with disabilities improved significantly for patients with blindness, deafness, mobility impairment, and language impairment. Although this change was significant for most measures from pre-event to post-event, it was significant for every measure from post-materials to post-event. Conclusion: A pre-clinical disabilities event in which second-year medical students interact with people with disabilities is effective in increasing student comfort level.-
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.subjectDoctoringen_US
dc.subjectDisabilitiesen_US
dc.subject.meshDisabled Personsen_US
dc.subject.meshClinical Competenceen_US
dc.subject.meshStudents, Medicalen_US
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en_US
dc.descriptionObjectives: To investigate second-year medical students’ change in comfort level after a disabilities-focused interactive session, with regards to disability etiquette and greeting, interviewing, and examining patients with disabilities. Setting: The University of Arizona College of Medicine, Phoenix Campus, doctoring suites. Students interacted in a clinical setting with volunteers with disabilities, including volunteers with blindness, deafness, mobility impairment, and language impairment. Students received 3 surveys during the study duration: the first before the event, the second after they had prepared for the event with didactic materials, and the third after the event. Participants: 46 second-year medical students participated in the event, and 29 students completed all surveys. Methods: Survey data was analyzed using paired t-tests wherever possible, with P <0.05 being interpreted as significant. 5 Results: Comfort level for disability etiquette and greeting, interviewing, and examining patients with disabilities improved significantly for patients with blindness, deafness, mobility impairment, and language impairment. Although this change was significant for most measures from pre-event to post-event, it was significant for every measure from post-materials to post-event. Conclusion: A pre-clinical disabilities event in which second-year medical students interact with people with disabilities is effective in increasing student comfort level.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorCampagnolo, Denise, MD, MSen_US
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