Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/221235
Title:
Whitefly Management in Arizona: Contribution of Natural Enemies to Whitefly Mortality
Author:
Naranjo, Steven E.; Ellsworth, Peter C.; Diehl, Jonathon W.
Affiliation:
USDA-ARS, Western Cotton Research Laboratory, Phoenix, AZ; University of Arizona, Maricopa, AZ
Issue Date:
Apr-1998
Publisher:
College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Cotton: A College of Agriculture Report
Abstract:
Direct-observation studies were conducted to identify causes and estimate rates of mortality of whiteflies over the course of four generations between late June to early September in replicated experimental plots. In plots receiving no whitefly insecticides. predation and dislodgment were major sources of egg and nymphal mortality and overall survival from egg to adult ranged from 1-8.5%. Similar patterns were observed in plots treated with insect growth regulators. except that Knack caused high levels of egg inviability and Applaud was a major source of mortality in small nymphs during the second generation immediately following single applications of these materials. Mortality due to predation was generally lowest for eggs and nymphs in plots treated with a rotation of conventional insecticides reflecting disruption of the predator fauna. Parasitism was a very minor source of mortality throughout. The selective action of the IGRs enhances the abundance and activity of natural enemies resulting in high levels of whitefly control with minimal use of disruptive insecticides. Natural enemies likely contribute to the "extended" residual effects of IGRs so commonly reported by growers.
Keywords:
Agriculture -- Arizona; Cotton -- Arizona; Cotton -- Insect investigations
Series/Report no.:
AZ1006

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleWhitefly Management in Arizona: Contribution of Natural Enemies to Whitefly Mortalityen_US
dc.contributor.authorNaranjo, Steven E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEllsworth, Peter C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDiehl, Jonathon W.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentUSDA-ARS, Western Cotton Research Laboratory, Phoenix, AZen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizona, Maricopa, AZen_US
dc.date.issued1998-04-
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.identifier.journalCotton: A College of Agriculture Reporten_US
dc.description.abstractDirect-observation studies were conducted to identify causes and estimate rates of mortality of whiteflies over the course of four generations between late June to early September in replicated experimental plots. In plots receiving no whitefly insecticides. predation and dislodgment were major sources of egg and nymphal mortality and overall survival from egg to adult ranged from 1-8.5%. Similar patterns were observed in plots treated with insect growth regulators. except that Knack caused high levels of egg inviability and Applaud was a major source of mortality in small nymphs during the second generation immediately following single applications of these materials. Mortality due to predation was generally lowest for eggs and nymphs in plots treated with a rotation of conventional insecticides reflecting disruption of the predator fauna. Parasitism was a very minor source of mortality throughout. The selective action of the IGRs enhances the abundance and activity of natural enemies resulting in high levels of whitefly control with minimal use of disruptive insecticides. Natural enemies likely contribute to the "extended" residual effects of IGRs so commonly reported by growers.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Insect investigationsen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/221235-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAZ1006en_US
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