Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/220559
Title:
Evaluation of Potato Leafhopper, Empoasca fabae L., Populations in Arizona Citrus
Author:
Byrne, David N.; Draeger, Erich A.
Issue Date:
Nov-1997
Publisher:
College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Citrus Research Report
Abstract:
The potato leafhopper, Empoasca fabae L., is a significant pest in the United States, and elsewhere, of alfalfa and potatoes In Arizona and in Coastal and Central California it can also be a pest of citrus. In 1994 and 1995 we collected information concerning their seasonal abundance in a large citrus orchard near Newman Peak Arizona. To do so we employed yellow sticky traps around the orchard periphery, at the same time using a D-Vac® vacuum sampler in the weeds growing in the interior of the orchard During both years peak populations occurred near mid April. This was correlated with a drop in relative humidity and a rise in ambient air temperature.
Keywords:
Agriculture -- Arizona; Citrus fruits -- Arizona; Citrus fruits -- Insects
Series/Report no.:
Series P-109; 370109
Sponsors:
Arizona Citrus Research Council

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleEvaluation of Potato Leafhopper, Empoasca fabae L., Populations in Arizona Citrusen_US
dc.contributor.authorByrne, David N.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDraeger, Erich A.en_US
dc.date.issued1997-11-
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.identifier.journalCitrus Research Reporten_US
dc.description.abstractThe potato leafhopper, Empoasca fabae L., is a significant pest in the United States, and elsewhere, of alfalfa and potatoes In Arizona and in Coastal and Central California it can also be a pest of citrus. In 1994 and 1995 we collected information concerning their seasonal abundance in a large citrus orchard near Newman Peak Arizona. To do so we employed yellow sticky traps around the orchard periphery, at the same time using a D-Vac® vacuum sampler in the weeds growing in the interior of the orchard During both years peak populations occurred near mid April. This was correlated with a drop in relative humidity and a rise in ambient air temperature.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectCitrus fruits -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectCitrus fruits -- Insectsen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/220559-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSeries P-109en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries370109en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipArizona Citrus Research Councilen_US
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