Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/219970
Title:
Refinement of Release Techniques for Whitefly Parasitoids
Author:
Byrne, David N.; Bellamy, David E.
Affiliation:
Department of Entomology
Issue Date:
Oct-1999
Publisher:
College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Vegetable: A College of Agriculture Report
Abstract:
Although they are currently effectively controlled by chemicals, sweet potato whiteflies have the potential to once again be a dominant pest in Arizona vegetables. We need to explore alternatives such as biological control so that we are not reliant solely on pesticides. We have been examining dispersal by the whitefly parasitoid Eretmocerus sp. in order to find more effective ways to deploy these agents in the field. We have learned in the laboratory that these wasps are efficient flyers since they are capable of moving into strong winds for more than 30 min. We also now know that most flight takes place within a short distance of the release point. We also have a better understanding of differences between male and female flight. This, along with other information we have obtained, will lead to our ability to effectively release these and parasitoids of other insect pests as well.
Keywords:
Agriculture -- Arizona; Vegetables -- Arizona; Vegetables -- Pesticide alternatives
Series/Report no.:
AZ1143; Series P-118

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleRefinement of Release Techniques for Whitefly Parasitoidsen_US
dc.contributor.authorByrne, David N.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBellamy, David E.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Entomologyen_US
dc.date.issued1999-10-
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.identifier.journalVegetable: A College of Agriculture Reporten_US
dc.description.abstractAlthough they are currently effectively controlled by chemicals, sweet potato whiteflies have the potential to once again be a dominant pest in Arizona vegetables. We need to explore alternatives such as biological control so that we are not reliant solely on pesticides. We have been examining dispersal by the whitefly parasitoid Eretmocerus sp. in order to find more effective ways to deploy these agents in the field. We have learned in the laboratory that these wasps are efficient flyers since they are capable of moving into strong winds for more than 30 min. We also now know that most flight takes place within a short distance of the release point. We also have a better understanding of differences between male and female flight. This, along with other information we have obtained, will lead to our ability to effectively release these and parasitoids of other insect pests as well.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectVegetables -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectVegetables -- Pesticide alternativesen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/219970-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAZ1143en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSeries P-118en_US
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