Mujeres en el Cruce: Mapping Family Separation/Reunification at a Time of Border (In)Security

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/219214
Title:
Mujeres en el Cruce: Mapping Family Separation/Reunification at a Time of Border (In)Security
Author:
O'Leary, Anna Ochoa
Affiliation:
University of Arizona, Mexican American Studies and Research Center
Issue Date:
2007
Rights:
The MASRC Working Paper Series © The Arizona Board of Regents
Collection Information:
The goal of the Mexican American Studies & Research Center's Working Paper Series is to disseminate recent research on the Mexican American experience. The Center welcomes papers from the social sciences, public policy fields, and the humanities. Areas of particular interest include economic and political participation of Mexican Americans, health, immigration, and education. The Mexican American Studies & Research Center assumes no responsibility for statements or opinions of contributors to its Working Paper Series.
Publisher:
University of Arizona, Mexican American Studies and Research Center
Abstract:
In this paper I discuss some of the findings in my study of the encounters between female migrants and immigration enforcement authorities along the U.S.-Mexico border. An objective of the research is to ascertain a more accurate picture of women temporarily suspended in the “intersection” of diametrically opposed processes: immigration enforcement and transnational mobility. Of the many issues that have emerged from this research, family separation is most palpable. This suggests a deeply entrenched relationship between immigration enforcement and the transnationalization of family ties. While this relationship may at first not be obvious, women’s accounts of family separation and family reunification show how, in reconciling these contradictory tendencies, migrant mobility is strengthened, which in turn challenges enforcement measures. In this way, the intersection not only sheds light on how opposing forces (enforcement and mobility) converge but also how each is contingent on the other. This analysis is possible in part through the use of a conceptual intersection of diametrically opposed forces, border enforcement and transnational movement, and thus proves useful in examining the transformative nature of globalized spaces.
Keywords:
United States. -- Immigration Border Patrol -- Officials and employees -- Mexican-American Border Region; Immigrants -- Mexican-American Border Region; Women migrant labor -- Mexican-American Border Region; Families -- Mexican-American Border Region
Identifiers:
0732-7749; http://hdl.handle.net/10150/219214; 793455574
Series/Report no.:
MASRC Working Paper Series; 34
Additional Links:
http://mas.arizona.edu/node/658

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleMujeres en el Cruce: Mapping Family Separation/Reunification at a Time of Border (In)Securityen_US
dc.contributor.authorO'Leary, Anna Ochoaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizona, Mexican American Studies and Research Centeren_US
dc.date.issued2007-
dc.rightsThe MASRC Working Paper Series © The Arizona Board of Regentsen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThe goal of the Mexican American Studies & Research Center's Working Paper Series is to disseminate recent research on the Mexican American experience. The Center welcomes papers from the social sciences, public policy fields, and the humanities. Areas of particular interest include economic and political participation of Mexican Americans, health, immigration, and education. The Mexican American Studies & Research Center assumes no responsibility for statements or opinions of contributors to its Working Paper Series.en_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona, Mexican American Studies and Research Centeren_US
dc.description.abstractIn this paper I discuss some of the findings in my study of the encounters between female migrants and immigration enforcement authorities along the U.S.-Mexico border. An objective of the research is to ascertain a more accurate picture of women temporarily suspended in the “intersection” of diametrically opposed processes: immigration enforcement and transnational mobility. Of the many issues that have emerged from this research, family separation is most palpable. This suggests a deeply entrenched relationship between immigration enforcement and the transnationalization of family ties. While this relationship may at first not be obvious, women’s accounts of family separation and family reunification show how, in reconciling these contradictory tendencies, migrant mobility is strengthened, which in turn challenges enforcement measures. In this way, the intersection not only sheds light on how opposing forces (enforcement and mobility) converge but also how each is contingent on the other. This analysis is possible in part through the use of a conceptual intersection of diametrically opposed forces, border enforcement and transnational movement, and thus proves useful in examining the transformative nature of globalized spaces.en_US
dc.subjectUnited States. -- Immigration Border Patrol -- Officials and employees -- Mexican-American Border Regionen_US
dc.subjectImmigrants -- Mexican-American Border Regionen_US
dc.subjectWomen migrant labor -- Mexican-American Border Regionen_US
dc.subjectFamilies -- Mexican-American Border Regionen_US
dc.identifier.issn0732-7749-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/219214-
dc.identifier.oclc793455574-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesMASRC Working Paper Series; 34en_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://mas.arizona.edu/node/658en_US
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