Of Information Highways and Toxic Byways: Women and Environmental Protest in a Northern Mexican City

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/219212
Title:
Of Information Highways and Toxic Byways: Women and Environmental Protest in a Northern Mexican City
Author:
O'Leary, Anna Ochoa
Affiliation:
Pima Community College, Department of Social and Cultural Studies
Issue Date:
2002
Rights:
The MASRC Working Paper Series © The Arizona Board of Regents
Collection Information:
The goal of the Mexican American Studies & Research Center's Working Paper Series is to disseminate recent research on the Mexican American experience. The Center welcomes papers from the social sciences, public policy fields, and the humanities. Areas of particular interest include economic and political participation of Mexican Americans, health, immigration, and education. The Mexican American Studies & Research Center assumes no responsibility for statements or opinions of contributors to its Working Paper Series.
Publisher:
University of Arizona, Mexican American Studies and Research Center
Abstract:
Women’s involvement in collective struggles for environmental quality has surged in recent years, as has research focusing on this phenomenon. Consistent with this research, a feminist lens is useful in revealing a model of community struggle that features women’s activities and strategies to expose environmental insult. I use a case study of community protest in Hermosillo, a city in the Mexican state of Sonora, to feature social networks as a means of politicizing the placement of a toxic waste dump six kilometers outside the city. A feminist perspective reveals these social networks to be more than a way to mobilize resources. It allow us to see the ways in which gender interacts with globalized relations of power, political ecology, and environmental policy, and to validate a creative way in which women can out-maneuver the gendered constraints to political participation. An analysis of how social networks served in this particular struggle suggests that they are an important component in the process through which women gained voice and authored oppositional discourse in contexts where these have been previously denied, and ultimately deconstructed the political authority that sanctioned the dump.
Keywords:
Women -- Political activity -- Mexico -- Hermosillo; Environmental protection -- Citizen participation -- Case studies; Environmental protection -- Mexico -- Hermosillo -- Citizen participation; Social networks -- Mexico -- Hermosillo; Protest movements -- Mexico -- Hermosillo -- Case studies; Women political activists -- Mexico -- Hermosillo; Hazardous waste sites -- Mexico -- Hermosillo
Identifiers:
0732-7749; http://hdl.handle.net/10150/219212; 793456038
Series/Report no.:
MASRC Working Paper Series; 30
Additional Links:
http://mas.arizona.edu/node/658

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleOf Information Highways and Toxic Byways: Women and Environmental Protest in a Northern Mexican Cityen_US
dc.contributor.authorO'Leary, Anna Ochoaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPima Community College, Department of Social and Cultural Studiesen_US
dc.date.issued2002-
dc.rightsThe MASRC Working Paper Series © The Arizona Board of Regentsen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThe goal of the Mexican American Studies & Research Center's Working Paper Series is to disseminate recent research on the Mexican American experience. The Center welcomes papers from the social sciences, public policy fields, and the humanities. Areas of particular interest include economic and political participation of Mexican Americans, health, immigration, and education. The Mexican American Studies & Research Center assumes no responsibility for statements or opinions of contributors to its Working Paper Series.en_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona, Mexican American Studies and Research Centeren_US
dc.description.abstractWomen’s involvement in collective struggles for environmental quality has surged in recent years, as has research focusing on this phenomenon. Consistent with this research, a feminist lens is useful in revealing a model of community struggle that features women’s activities and strategies to expose environmental insult. I use a case study of community protest in Hermosillo, a city in the Mexican state of Sonora, to feature social networks as a means of politicizing the placement of a toxic waste dump six kilometers outside the city. A feminist perspective reveals these social networks to be more than a way to mobilize resources. It allow us to see the ways in which gender interacts with globalized relations of power, political ecology, and environmental policy, and to validate a creative way in which women can out-maneuver the gendered constraints to political participation. An analysis of how social networks served in this particular struggle suggests that they are an important component in the process through which women gained voice and authored oppositional discourse in contexts where these have been previously denied, and ultimately deconstructed the political authority that sanctioned the dump.en_US
dc.subjectWomen -- Political activity -- Mexico -- Hermosilloen_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental protection -- Citizen participation -- Case studiesen_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental protection -- Mexico -- Hermosillo -- Citizen participationen_US
dc.subjectSocial networks -- Mexico -- Hermosilloen_US
dc.subjectProtest movements -- Mexico -- Hermosillo -- Case studiesen_US
dc.subjectWomen political activists -- Mexico -- Hermosilloen_US
dc.subjectHazardous waste sites -- Mexico -- Hermosilloen_US
dc.identifier.issn0732-7749-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/219212-
dc.identifier.oclc793456038-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesMASRC Working Paper Series; 30en_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://mas.arizona.edu/node/658en_US
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