Viva Emiliano Zapata! Viva Benito Juarez! Helping Mexican and Chicano Middle School Students Develop a Chicano Consciousness via Critical Pedagogy and Latino/Latina Critical Race Theory

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/219198
Title:
Viva Emiliano Zapata! Viva Benito Juarez! Helping Mexican and Chicano Middle School Students Develop a Chicano Consciousness via Critical Pedagogy and Latino/Latina Critical Race Theory
Author:
Casas, Martha
Affiliation:
University of Texas, El Paso, Teacher Education Department
Issue Date:
2006
Rights:
The MASRC Working Paper Series © The Arizona Board of Regents
Collection Information:
The goal of the Mexican American Studies & Research Center's Working Paper Series is to disseminate recent research on the Mexican American experience. The Center welcomes papers from the social sciences, public policy fields, and the humanities. Areas of particular interest include economic and political participation of Mexican Americans, health, immigration, and education. The Mexican American Studies & Research Center assumes no responsibility for statements or opinions of contributors to its Working Paper Series.
Publisher:
University of Arizona, Mexican American Studies and Research Center
Abstract:
This article describes how an anti-racist curriculum constructed on Critical Race Theory (CRT) and Latino Critical Pedagogy (LatCrit) helped Mexican and Chicano middle school students enrolled in an alternative education program to alter their attitudes toward the use of English, and to change their forms of self-identification resulting in the development of a Chicano consciousness. In the beginning of this fourteen-month study, 9.6% of the students identified with the Chicano label. However, at the end of the study, 77% of the class selected the Chicano label for self-identification. Moreover, this investigation bridges the theoretical concepts of Critical Pedagogy to everyday practice in a middle school classroom. In short, the tenets of this theoretical framework were applied in the design and the implementation of the curriculum.
Keywords:
Critical pedagogy -- United States -- Case studies; Mexican Americans -- Ethnic identity
Identifiers:
0732-7749; http://hdl.handle.net/10150/219198; 793455574
Series/Report no.:
MASRC Working Paper Series; 33
Additional Links:
http://mas.arizona.edu/node/658

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleViva Emiliano Zapata! Viva Benito Juarez! Helping Mexican and Chicano Middle School Students Develop a Chicano Consciousness via Critical Pedagogy and Latino/Latina Critical Race Theoryen_US
dc.contributor.authorCasas, Marthaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Texas, El Paso, Teacher Education Departmenten_US
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.rightsThe MASRC Working Paper Series © The Arizona Board of Regentsen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThe goal of the Mexican American Studies & Research Center's Working Paper Series is to disseminate recent research on the Mexican American experience. The Center welcomes papers from the social sciences, public policy fields, and the humanities. Areas of particular interest include economic and political participation of Mexican Americans, health, immigration, and education. The Mexican American Studies & Research Center assumes no responsibility for statements or opinions of contributors to its Working Paper Series.en_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona, Mexican American Studies and Research Centeren_US
dc.description.abstractThis article describes how an anti-racist curriculum constructed on Critical Race Theory (CRT) and Latino Critical Pedagogy (LatCrit) helped Mexican and Chicano middle school students enrolled in an alternative education program to alter their attitudes toward the use of English, and to change their forms of self-identification resulting in the development of a Chicano consciousness. In the beginning of this fourteen-month study, 9.6% of the students identified with the Chicano label. However, at the end of the study, 77% of the class selected the Chicano label for self-identification. Moreover, this investigation bridges the theoretical concepts of Critical Pedagogy to everyday practice in a middle school classroom. In short, the tenets of this theoretical framework were applied in the design and the implementation of the curriculum.en_US
dc.subjectCritical pedagogy -- United States -- Case studiesen_US
dc.subjectMexican Americans -- Ethnic identityen_US
dc.identifier.issn0732-7749-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/219198-
dc.identifier.oclc793455574-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesMASRC Working Paper Series; 33en_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://mas.arizona.edu/node/658en_US
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