Flexible Labor and Underinvestment in Women’s Education on the U.S-Mexico Border

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/219197
Title:
Flexible Labor and Underinvestment in Women’s Education on the U.S-Mexico Border
Author:
O’Leary, Anna Ochoa; Valdez-Gardea, Gloria Ciria; González, Norma
Affiliation:
University of Arizona, Mexican American Studies and Research Center; Colegio de Sonora, Urban and Environmental Studies Program; University of Utah, Department of Education, Culture and Society
Issue Date:
2005
Rights:
The MASRC Working Paper Series © The Arizona Board of Regents
Collection Information:
The goal of the Mexican American Studies & Research Center's Working Paper Series is to disseminate recent research on the Mexican American experience. The Center welcomes papers from the social sciences, public policy fields, and the humanities. Areas of particular interest include economic and political participation of Mexican Americans, health, immigration, and education. The Mexican American Studies & Research Center assumes no responsibility for statements or opinions of contributors to its Working Paper Series.
Publisher:
University of Arizona, Mexican American Studies and Research Center
Abstract:
For the past 35 years, borderland industry has opened employment opportunities for women in the community of Nogales, Arizona. However, the expansion of free trade with the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) has aggravated economic instability by promoting the flexible use of labor, a practice that women have increasingly accommodated. Case studies of women engaged in the retail and maquiladora industries illustrate the interplay between flexible employment, reproduction, and education. These cases suggest that a strong connection between flexible employment and reproduction is sustained by ideologies that see these as mutually complimentary. At the same time, the connections between education and employment and reproduction activities are notably absent or weak. We argue that investing in the education of women, which could lead to more predictable employment, is in this way subverted by regional economic instability. The alienation of education from the other two realms of women’s activities works to the advantage of flexible employment practices and advances the underdevelopment of human capital on the U.S.-Mexico border.
Keywords:
Hispanic American women -- Education -- Mexican-American Border Region; Hispanic American women -- Employment -- Mexican-American Border Region
Identifiers:
0732-7749; http://hdl.handle.net/10150/219197; 793455574
Series/Report no.:
MASRC Working Paper Series; 32
Additional Links:
http://mas.arizona.edu/node/658

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleFlexible Labor and Underinvestment in Women’s Education on the U.S-Mexico Borderen_US
dc.contributor.authorO’Leary, Anna Ochoaen_US
dc.contributor.authorValdez-Gardea, Gloria Ciriaen_US
dc.contributor.authorGonzález, Normaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizona, Mexican American Studies and Research Centeren_US
dc.contributor.departmentColegio de Sonora, Urban and Environmental Studies Programen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Utah, Department of Education, Culture and Societyen_US
dc.date.issued2005-
dc.rightsThe MASRC Working Paper Series © The Arizona Board of Regentsen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThe goal of the Mexican American Studies & Research Center's Working Paper Series is to disseminate recent research on the Mexican American experience. The Center welcomes papers from the social sciences, public policy fields, and the humanities. Areas of particular interest include economic and political participation of Mexican Americans, health, immigration, and education. The Mexican American Studies & Research Center assumes no responsibility for statements or opinions of contributors to its Working Paper Series.en_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona, Mexican American Studies and Research Centeren_US
dc.description.abstractFor the past 35 years, borderland industry has opened employment opportunities for women in the community of Nogales, Arizona. However, the expansion of free trade with the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) has aggravated economic instability by promoting the flexible use of labor, a practice that women have increasingly accommodated. Case studies of women engaged in the retail and maquiladora industries illustrate the interplay between flexible employment, reproduction, and education. These cases suggest that a strong connection between flexible employment and reproduction is sustained by ideologies that see these as mutually complimentary. At the same time, the connections between education and employment and reproduction activities are notably absent or weak. We argue that investing in the education of women, which could lead to more predictable employment, is in this way subverted by regional economic instability. The alienation of education from the other two realms of women’s activities works to the advantage of flexible employment practices and advances the underdevelopment of human capital on the U.S.-Mexico border.en_US
dc.subjectHispanic American women -- Education -- Mexican-American Border Regionen_US
dc.subjectHispanic American women -- Employment -- Mexican-American Border Regionen_US
dc.identifier.issn0732-7749-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/219197-
dc.identifier.oclc793455574-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesMASRC Working Paper Series; 32en_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://mas.arizona.edu/node/658en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.