LULAC and Veterans Organize for Civil Rights in Tempe and Phoenix, 1940-1947

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/219196
Title:
LULAC and Veterans Organize for Civil Rights in Tempe and Phoenix, 1940-1947
Author:
Marín, Christine
Affiliation:
Arizona State University
Issue Date:
2001
Rights:
The MASRC Working Paper Series © The Arizona Board of Regents
Collection Information:
The goal of the Mexican American Studies & Research Center's Working Paper Series is to disseminate recent research on the Mexican American experience. The Center welcomes papers from the social sciences, public policy fields, and the humanities. Areas of particular interest include economic and political participation of Mexican Americans, health, immigration, and education. The Mexican American Studies & Research Center assumes no responsibility for statements or opinions of contributors to its Working Paper Series.
Publisher:
University of Arizona, Mexican American Studies and Research Center
Abstract:
World War II had a dramatic impact on Americans, including Mexican Americans in Arizona. It challenged families and communities to make sacrifices during wartime. Mexican Americans served in large numbers and with distinction in the war, and after it ended they sought to defend their rights as Americans, and to eliminate the discriminatory behavior and acts that kept them within ethnic boundaries. The segregation at Tempe Beach, the “brilliant star in Tempe’s crown,” and its “No Mexicans Allowed” policy, initiated in 1923, was one of them. Another ethnic boundary was the segregated housing policy for veterans established by the City of Phoenix in 1946. In Tempe and Phoenix, the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) Council 110, led by Placida Garcia Smith, and the American Legion Thunderbird Post 41, led by Ray Martinez, were at the front lines in the fight against racism and discrimination in the 1940s. Mexican Americans confronted public elected officials over racist practices and policies of exclusion, and utilized the court system to provide them equal justice under the law. They exercised their right to seek equality after years of segregation, and to secure their civil rights as Americans. Their actions are examples of American-style civic activism, a devotion to the United States and the ideals of freedom and democracy. The search for that freedom and holding the government accountable to its laws and ideals are what drove LULAC Council 110 and American Legion Thunderbird Post 41 as they organized and agitated for the civil rights of Mexican Americans in Tempe and Phoenix during the 1940s.
Keywords:
Mexican Americans -- Civil rights -- Arizona -- Tempe; Mexican Americans -- Civil rights -- Arizona -- Phoenix; World War, 1939-1945 -- Veterans -- Arizona -- Tempe; World War, 1939-1945 -- Veterans -- Arizona -- Phoenix; League of United Latin American Citizens
Identifiers:
0732-7749; http://hdl.handle.net/10150/219196; 793451604
Series/Report no.:
MASRC Working Paper Series; 29
Additional Links:
http://mas.arizona.edu/node/658

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleLULAC and Veterans Organize for Civil Rights in Tempe and Phoenix, 1940-1947en_US
dc.contributor.authorMarín, Christineen_US
dc.contributor.departmentArizona State Universityen_US
dc.date.issued2001-
dc.rightsThe MASRC Working Paper Series © The Arizona Board of Regentsen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThe goal of the Mexican American Studies & Research Center's Working Paper Series is to disseminate recent research on the Mexican American experience. The Center welcomes papers from the social sciences, public policy fields, and the humanities. Areas of particular interest include economic and political participation of Mexican Americans, health, immigration, and education. The Mexican American Studies & Research Center assumes no responsibility for statements or opinions of contributors to its Working Paper Series.en_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona, Mexican American Studies and Research Centeren_US
dc.description.abstractWorld War II had a dramatic impact on Americans, including Mexican Americans in Arizona. It challenged families and communities to make sacrifices during wartime. Mexican Americans served in large numbers and with distinction in the war, and after it ended they sought to defend their rights as Americans, and to eliminate the discriminatory behavior and acts that kept them within ethnic boundaries. The segregation at Tempe Beach, the “brilliant star in Tempe’s crown,” and its “No Mexicans Allowed” policy, initiated in 1923, was one of them. Another ethnic boundary was the segregated housing policy for veterans established by the City of Phoenix in 1946. In Tempe and Phoenix, the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) Council 110, led by Placida Garcia Smith, and the American Legion Thunderbird Post 41, led by Ray Martinez, were at the front lines in the fight against racism and discrimination in the 1940s. Mexican Americans confronted public elected officials over racist practices and policies of exclusion, and utilized the court system to provide them equal justice under the law. They exercised their right to seek equality after years of segregation, and to secure their civil rights as Americans. Their actions are examples of American-style civic activism, a devotion to the United States and the ideals of freedom and democracy. The search for that freedom and holding the government accountable to its laws and ideals are what drove LULAC Council 110 and American Legion Thunderbird Post 41 as they organized and agitated for the civil rights of Mexican Americans in Tempe and Phoenix during the 1940s.en_US
dc.subjectMexican Americans -- Civil rights -- Arizona -- Tempeen_US
dc.subjectMexican Americans -- Civil rights -- Arizona -- Phoenixen_US
dc.subjectWorld War, 1939-1945 -- Veterans -- Arizona -- Tempeen_US
dc.subjectWorld War, 1939-1945 -- Veterans -- Arizona -- Phoenixen_US
dc.subjectLeague of United Latin American Citizensen_US
dc.identifier.issn0732-7749-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/219196-
dc.identifier.oclc793451604-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesMASRC Working Paper Series; 29en_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://mas.arizona.edu/node/658en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.