The Influence of Cultural Values On Self-Efficacy in Reducing HIV Risk Behaviors

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/219195
Title:
The Influence of Cultural Values On Self-Efficacy in Reducing HIV Risk Behaviors
Author:
Estrada, Antonio L.; Estrada, Barbara D.; Quintero, Gilbert
Affiliation:
University of Arizona, Mexican American Studies & Research Center; University of Arizona, Southwest Institute for Research on Women
Issue Date:
1999
Rights:
The MASRC Working Paper Series © The Arizona Board of Regents
Collection Information:
The goal of the Mexican American Studies & Research Center's Working Paper Series is to disseminate recent research on the Mexican American experience. The Center welcomes papers from the social sciences, public policy fields, and the humanities. Areas of particular interest include economic and political participation of Mexican Americans, health, immigration, and education. The Mexican American Studies & Research Center assumes no responsibility for statements or opinions of contributors to its Working Paper Series.
Publisher:
University of Arizona, Mexican American Studies and Research Center
Abstract:
This study seeks to examine the influence of key cultural values like machismo, familism, traditionalism, and religiosity on self-efficacy in reducing HIV risk among Mexican-origin IDUs. The purpose of this examination hinges on the importance of including cultural concepts/values not only to facilitate process, but also to add a cultural dimension to an HIV/AIDS intervention that may facilitate attitudinal and behavioral change as well. The findings suggest that culturally innovative approaches can facilitate HIV/AIDS risk reduction among male Mexican-origin drug injectors. The importance of key cultural values like machismo is underscored by its association with HIV risk reduction for both sexual and injection related risks. Intervention programs must identify strategies to incorporate cultural values in their research and evaluation of intervention efficacy. Culturally innovative approaches hold the promise of substantially reducing HIV risk behaviors among Hispanic drug injectors, and may hold promise for other populations affected by HIV/AIDS as well.
Keywords:
HIV infections -- United States; Intravenous drug abuse -- United States; Mexican Americans -- Mental health; Self-efficacy; Risk-taking (Psychology)
Identifiers:
0732-7749; http://hdl.handle.net/10150/219195; 663199484
Series/Report no.:
MASRC Working Paper Series; 28
Additional Links:
http://mas.arizona.edu/node/658
Sponsors:
National Institute of Drug Abuse

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe Influence of Cultural Values On Self-Efficacy in Reducing HIV Risk Behaviorsen_US
dc.contributor.authorEstrada, Antonio L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEstrada, Barbara D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorQuintero, Gilberten_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizona, Mexican American Studies & Research Centeren_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizona, Southwest Institute for Research on Womenen_US
dc.date.issued1999-
dc.rightsThe MASRC Working Paper Series © The Arizona Board of Regentsen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThe goal of the Mexican American Studies & Research Center's Working Paper Series is to disseminate recent research on the Mexican American experience. The Center welcomes papers from the social sciences, public policy fields, and the humanities. Areas of particular interest include economic and political participation of Mexican Americans, health, immigration, and education. The Mexican American Studies & Research Center assumes no responsibility for statements or opinions of contributors to its Working Paper Series.en_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona, Mexican American Studies and Research Centeren_US
dc.description.abstractThis study seeks to examine the influence of key cultural values like machismo, familism, traditionalism, and religiosity on self-efficacy in reducing HIV risk among Mexican-origin IDUs. The purpose of this examination hinges on the importance of including cultural concepts/values not only to facilitate process, but also to add a cultural dimension to an HIV/AIDS intervention that may facilitate attitudinal and behavioral change as well. The findings suggest that culturally innovative approaches can facilitate HIV/AIDS risk reduction among male Mexican-origin drug injectors. The importance of key cultural values like machismo is underscored by its association with HIV risk reduction for both sexual and injection related risks. Intervention programs must identify strategies to incorporate cultural values in their research and evaluation of intervention efficacy. Culturally innovative approaches hold the promise of substantially reducing HIV risk behaviors among Hispanic drug injectors, and may hold promise for other populations affected by HIV/AIDS as well.en_US
dc.subjectHIV infections -- United Statesen_US
dc.subjectIntravenous drug abuse -- United Statesen_US
dc.subjectMexican Americans -- Mental healthen_US
dc.subjectSelf-efficacyen_US
dc.subjectRisk-taking (Psychology)en_US
dc.identifier.issn0732-7749-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/219195-
dc.identifier.oclc663199484-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesMASRC Working Paper Series; 28en_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://mas.arizona.edu/node/658en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institute of Drug Abuseen_US
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