Dilemmas of the High Achieving Chicana: The Double-Bind Factor in Male/Female Relationships

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/218653
Title:
Dilemmas of the High Achieving Chicana: The Double-Bind Factor in Male/Female Relationships
Author:
González, Judith T.
Issue Date:
1987
Rights:
The MASRC Working Paper Series © The Arizona Board of Regents
Collection Information:
The goal of the Mexican American Studies & Research Center's Working Paper Series is to disseminate recent research on the Mexican American experience. The Center welcomes papers from the social sciences, public policy fields, and the humanities. Areas of particular interest include economic and political participation of Mexican Americans, health, immigration, and education. The Mexican American Studies & Research Center assumes no responsibility for statements or opinions of contributors to its Working Paper Series.
Publisher:
University of Arizona, Mexican American Studies and Research Center
Abstract:
The central research question of this exploratory study is to determine if college educated, ethnically identified and preferred endogamous Chicanas experience significantly more psychological distress due to a conflict between their educational achievements and beliefs that Chicano males are threatened by high achieving women. The specific perceptions are: that Mexican American males feel threatened by their educational accomplishments, tend to exclude them from political and organizational activities, and that college attainment will cause them to be seen as elitist by the larger Chicano community. This study uses descriptive and correlational analysis to explore the relationship between ethnic identification, preferred endogamy and perceptions that Chicanas high achievements pose a threat to Chicano males as predictive factors for higher psychological distress. The sample consists of 508 randomly selected Chicanas at five colleges, varying in selectivity from a private university to a community college. The majority of respondents are single and under thirty. A sample of 160 Chicano males were also randomly selected from three of the same five college campuses and were used to make comparisons on the threat dimension. The instrument is a mail questionnaire.
Keywords:
Sex role -- United States; Mexican American women
Identifiers:
0732-7749; http://hdl.handle.net/10150/218653; 652082173
Series/Report no.:
MASRC Working Paper Series; 10
Additional Links:
http://mas.arizona.edu/node/658
Sponsors:
Stanford University, Center for Research on Women.; Funded by the Ford Foundation, 1980-81.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleDilemmas of the High Achieving Chicana: The Double-Bind Factor in Male/Female Relationshipsen_US
dc.contributor.authorGonzález, Judith T.en_US
dc.date.issued1987-
dc.rightsThe MASRC Working Paper Series © The Arizona Board of Regentsen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThe goal of the Mexican American Studies & Research Center's Working Paper Series is to disseminate recent research on the Mexican American experience. The Center welcomes papers from the social sciences, public policy fields, and the humanities. Areas of particular interest include economic and political participation of Mexican Americans, health, immigration, and education. The Mexican American Studies & Research Center assumes no responsibility for statements or opinions of contributors to its Working Paper Series.en_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona, Mexican American Studies and Research Centeren_US
dc.description.abstractThe central research question of this exploratory study is to determine if college educated, ethnically identified and preferred endogamous Chicanas experience significantly more psychological distress due to a conflict between their educational achievements and beliefs that Chicano males are threatened by high achieving women. The specific perceptions are: that Mexican American males feel threatened by their educational accomplishments, tend to exclude them from political and organizational activities, and that college attainment will cause them to be seen as elitist by the larger Chicano community. This study uses descriptive and correlational analysis to explore the relationship between ethnic identification, preferred endogamy and perceptions that Chicanas high achievements pose a threat to Chicano males as predictive factors for higher psychological distress. The sample consists of 508 randomly selected Chicanas at five colleges, varying in selectivity from a private university to a community college. The majority of respondents are single and under thirty. A sample of 160 Chicano males were also randomly selected from three of the same five college campuses and were used to make comparisons on the threat dimension. The instrument is a mail questionnaire.en_US
dc.subjectSex role -- United Statesen_US
dc.subjectMexican American womenen_US
dc.identifier.issn0732-7749-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/218653-
dc.identifier.oclc652082173-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesMASRC Working Paper Series; 10en_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://mas.arizona.edu/node/658en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipStanford University, Center for Research on Women.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunded by the Ford Foundation, 1980-81.-
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.