Phenotypic Discrimination and Income Differences Among Mexican Americans

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/218633
Title:
Phenotypic Discrimination and Income Differences Among Mexican Americans
Author:
Telles, Edward E.; Murguia, Edward
Affiliation:
University of Texas at Austin; Trinity University
Issue Date:
1988
Rights:
The MASRC Working Paper Series © The Arizona Board of Regents
Collection Information:
The goal of the Mexican American Studies & Research Center's Working Paper Series is to disseminate recent research on the Mexican American experience. The Center welcomes papers from the social sciences, public policy fields, and the humanities. Areas of particular interest include economic and political participation of Mexican Americans, health, immigration, and education. The Mexican American Studies & Research Center assumes no responsibility for statements or opinions of contributors to its Working Paper Series.
Publisher:
University of Arizona, Mexican American Studies and Research Center
Abstract:
Using a national probability sample of approximately 1,000 Mexican American heads of household, we analyze a subsample of 253 Mexican American male wage earners and present evidence of the importance of phenotype, measured by skin color and physical features, on earnings, controlling for other factors known to affect earnings. Even after controlling these variables, individuals with a dark and Native American phenotype continue to receive significantly lower earnings than individuals of a lighter and more European phenotype. A decomposition of differences in earnings reveals that most of the differential in earnings between the darkest one-third of the sample and the lighter two-thirds is due not to differences in endowments but rather to labor market discrimination. When taken as a whole, Mexican Americans in all phenotypic groups remain far from having incomes comparable to those of non-Hispanic whites.
Keywords:
Wages -- Mexican Americans; Mexican Americans -- Employment; Discrimination in employment -- United States
Identifiers:
0732-7749; http://hdl.handle.net/10150/218633; 654377848
Series/Report no.:
MASRC Working Paper Series; 13
Additional Links:
http://mas.arizona.edu/node/658

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titlePhenotypic Discrimination and Income Differences Among Mexican Americansen_US
dc.contributor.authorTelles, Edward E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMurguia, Edwarden_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Texas at Austinen_US
dc.contributor.departmentTrinity Universityen_US
dc.date.issued1988-
dc.rightsThe MASRC Working Paper Series © The Arizona Board of Regentsen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThe goal of the Mexican American Studies & Research Center's Working Paper Series is to disseminate recent research on the Mexican American experience. The Center welcomes papers from the social sciences, public policy fields, and the humanities. Areas of particular interest include economic and political participation of Mexican Americans, health, immigration, and education. The Mexican American Studies & Research Center assumes no responsibility for statements or opinions of contributors to its Working Paper Series.en_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona, Mexican American Studies and Research Centeren_US
dc.description.abstractUsing a national probability sample of approximately 1,000 Mexican American heads of household, we analyze a subsample of 253 Mexican American male wage earners and present evidence of the importance of phenotype, measured by skin color and physical features, on earnings, controlling for other factors known to affect earnings. Even after controlling these variables, individuals with a dark and Native American phenotype continue to receive significantly lower earnings than individuals of a lighter and more European phenotype. A decomposition of differences in earnings reveals that most of the differential in earnings between the darkest one-third of the sample and the lighter two-thirds is due not to differences in endowments but rather to labor market discrimination. When taken as a whole, Mexican Americans in all phenotypic groups remain far from having incomes comparable to those of non-Hispanic whites.en_US
dc.subjectWages -- Mexican Americansen_US
dc.subjectMexican Americans -- Employmenten_US
dc.subjectDiscrimination in employment -- United Statesen_US
dc.identifier.issn0732-7749-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/218633-
dc.identifier.oclc654377848-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesMASRC Working Paper Series; 13en_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://mas.arizona.edu/node/658en_US
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