The Border Patrol and News Media Coverage of Undocumented Mexican Immigrants During the 1970s: A Quantitative Content Analysis in the Sociology of Knowledge.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/217889
Title:
The Border Patrol and News Media Coverage of Undocumented Mexican Immigrants During the 1970s: A Quantitative Content Analysis in the Sociology of Knowledge.
Author:
Fernández, Celestino; Pedroza, Lawrence R.
Affiliation:
University of Arizona, Department of Sociology
Issue Date:
1981
Rights:
The MASRC Working Paper Series © The Arizona Board of Regents
Collection Information:
The goal of the Mexican American Studies & Research Center's Working Paper Series is to disseminate recent research on the Mexican American experience. The Center welcomes papers from the social sciences, public policy fields, and the humanities. Areas of particular interest include economic and political participation of Mexican Americans, health, immigration, and education. The Mexican American Studies & Research Center assumes no responsibility for statements or opinions of contributors to its Working Paper Series.
Publisher:
University of Arizona, Mexican American Studies and Research Center
Abstract:
The mass media through their power of mass persuasion have an impact on the readers’, viewers’ or listeners’ perceptions of social phenomena. This paper reports on a quantitative content analysis of articles appearing in the Los Angeles Times, New York Times, Washington Post, and Arizona Daily Star between 1972 and 1978 that dealt with the subject of undocumented (illegal) immigration from Mexico to the U.S. In this way, it is an empirical study in the sociology of knowledge that examines the social reality constructed by the news media regarding this complex social issue. We found a significant increase in the number of articles appearing each year on this topic. Relatively few were written by Spanish-surnamed individuals or used undocumented immigrants as sources of information. In fact, most of the information presented in the articles was obtained from the Border Patrol, Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS), and politicians. We conclude that news media coverage of undocumented Mexican immigration was not balanced and that the American public accepted the biased information they read as an accurate reflection of social reality.
Keywords:
Mexican Americans and mass media; American newspapers; Illegal aliens -- United States
Identifiers:
0732-7749; http://hdl.handle.net/10150/217889; 656656460
Series/Report no.:
MASRC Working Paper Series; 2
Additional Links:
http://mas.arizona.edu/node/658
Sponsors:
Part of this work was supported by a grant from the University of Arizona Foundation.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe Border Patrol and News Media Coverage of Undocumented Mexican Immigrants During the 1970s: A Quantitative Content Analysis in the Sociology of Knowledge.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFernández, Celestinoen_US
dc.contributor.authorPedroza, Lawrence R.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizona, Department of Sociologyen_US
dc.date.issued1981-
dc.rightsThe MASRC Working Paper Series © The Arizona Board of Regentsen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThe goal of the Mexican American Studies & Research Center's Working Paper Series is to disseminate recent research on the Mexican American experience. The Center welcomes papers from the social sciences, public policy fields, and the humanities. Areas of particular interest include economic and political participation of Mexican Americans, health, immigration, and education. The Mexican American Studies & Research Center assumes no responsibility for statements or opinions of contributors to its Working Paper Series.en_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona, Mexican American Studies and Research Centeren_US
dc.description.abstractThe mass media through their power of mass persuasion have an impact on the readers’, viewers’ or listeners’ perceptions of social phenomena. This paper reports on a quantitative content analysis of articles appearing in the Los Angeles Times, New York Times, Washington Post, and Arizona Daily Star between 1972 and 1978 that dealt with the subject of undocumented (illegal) immigration from Mexico to the U.S. In this way, it is an empirical study in the sociology of knowledge that examines the social reality constructed by the news media regarding this complex social issue. We found a significant increase in the number of articles appearing each year on this topic. Relatively few were written by Spanish-surnamed individuals or used undocumented immigrants as sources of information. In fact, most of the information presented in the articles was obtained from the Border Patrol, Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS), and politicians. We conclude that news media coverage of undocumented Mexican immigration was not balanced and that the American public accepted the biased information they read as an accurate reflection of social reality.en_US
dc.subjectMexican Americans and mass mediaen_US
dc.subjectAmerican newspapersen_US
dc.subjectIllegal aliens -- United States-
dc.identifier.issn0732-7749-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/217889-
dc.identifier.oclc656656460-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesMASRC Working Paper Series; 2en_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://mas.arizona.edu/node/658en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipPart of this work was supported by a grant from the University of Arizona Foundation.en_US
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