Arsenic and Olfactomedin-1 Regulation of Epithelial to Mesenchymal Cell Transition (EMT) in Heart Valve Development

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/217109
Title:
Arsenic and Olfactomedin-1 Regulation of Epithelial to Mesenchymal Cell Transition (EMT) in Heart Valve Development
Author:
Lencinas Sanabria, Alejandro
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation centers on the study of epithelial to mesenchymal cell transition (EMT) in the heart model of valve development. EMT is a process used by specific cells to invade adjacent matrix in order to differentiate into a three-dimensional structure. The first section of the project includes a study on the effects of inorganic arsenic on EMT and therefore the environmental concerns produced by deleterious effects on EMT. The second section focuses on the discovery of an intrinsic regulator of EMT, olfactomedin-1 (OLFM1). The discovery of a novel regulator of EMT in the atrioventricular canal is interesting, by itself, as it allows us to better understand the intrinsic molecular regulation of EMT in valve formation of the heart. The activity of this protein, as a regulator of cell invasion, identifies an important checkpoint in EMT. Because OFLM1 is conserved across many species, including humans, it may be a common or shared regulator of all types of EMT including cancer. Therefore, OLFM1 represents a promising new target for an anti-cancer agent as well as a potential clinical inducer of EMT to repair congenital heart disease that include valve defects.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Collagen Gel; EMT checkpoint; Heart valve formation; Olfactomedin-1; Pharmacology & Toxicology; Arsenic; Cancer metastasis
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Pharmacology & Toxicology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Runyan, Raymond B.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleArsenic and Olfactomedin-1 Regulation of Epithelial to Mesenchymal Cell Transition (EMT) in Heart Valve Developmenten_US
dc.creatorLencinas Sanabria, Alejandroen_US
dc.contributor.authorLencinas Sanabria, Alejandroen_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation centers on the study of epithelial to mesenchymal cell transition (EMT) in the heart model of valve development. EMT is a process used by specific cells to invade adjacent matrix in order to differentiate into a three-dimensional structure. The first section of the project includes a study on the effects of inorganic arsenic on EMT and therefore the environmental concerns produced by deleterious effects on EMT. The second section focuses on the discovery of an intrinsic regulator of EMT, olfactomedin-1 (OLFM1). The discovery of a novel regulator of EMT in the atrioventricular canal is interesting, by itself, as it allows us to better understand the intrinsic molecular regulation of EMT in valve formation of the heart. The activity of this protein, as a regulator of cell invasion, identifies an important checkpoint in EMT. Because OFLM1 is conserved across many species, including humans, it may be a common or shared regulator of all types of EMT including cancer. Therefore, OLFM1 represents a promising new target for an anti-cancer agent as well as a potential clinical inducer of EMT to repair congenital heart disease that include valve defects.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectCollagen Gelen_US
dc.subjectEMT checkpointen_US
dc.subjectHeart valve formationen_US
dc.subjectOlfactomedin-1en_US
dc.subjectPharmacology & Toxicologyen_US
dc.subjectArsenicen_US
dc.subjectCancer metastasisen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePharmacology & Toxicologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRunyan, Raymond B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCamenisch, Todd D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRegan, John W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLantz, Robert Clarken_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRunyan, Raymond B.en_US
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