Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/217090
Title:
Charge Transfer at Metal Oxide/Organic Interfaces
Author:
Schirra, Laura Kristy
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Interfacial charge transfer between metal oxides and organic semiconductors has been found to limit the efficiency of organic optoelectronic devices. Although a number of investigations of inorganic/organic systems exist, very few generally applicable rules for oxide/organic interfaces have been developed and many questions about these systems remain unanswered. Thus the studies presented in this dissertation were designed to improve the understanding of the fundamental interface physics of metal oxide/organic systems. Single molecule fluorescence microscopy was employed to determine the charge transfer mechanism while photoelectron spectroscopy was used to determine the energy level alignment of model systems. Additional computational studies allowed the examination of the properties of the charged organic molecules involved in charge transfer and modeling of the molecule-surface interaction. Calculations of the ground state properties and excited state transitions of the neutral and singly charged states of a modified perylene molecule were performed to provide insight into the orbitals of the initial and final states involved in the interfacial charge transfer process. The design and implementation of a novel UHV single molecule microscope is described. This microscope was used to observe the excited state charge transfer between a modified perylene molecule and Al₂O₃ (0001). The charge transfer mechanism was identified as involving activated trapping and detrapping of the defect derived states within the Al₂O₃ band gap, which resulted in the observation of strongly distributed kinetics for this system. The influence of defects and adsorbates on the electronic structure of ZnO and its interface with organic semiconductors was determined from photoelectron spectroscopy. Modified perylene molecules were found to have strong chemisorptive interactions with the ZnO surface involving charge transfer from defect derived ZnO states to the LUMO, while magnesium phthalocyanine molecules appear to have only weak physisorptive interactions with the ZnO surface. The interfacial investigations of the organic/oxide systems demonstrate the rich defect structure present in metal oxides. In both cases, defects were found to control the interfacial interactions between the metal oxide surface and the modified perylene molecules. Thus the manipulation of these defects states is of fundamental importance for optoelectronic device design.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
photoelectron spectroscopy; sapphire; single molecule; ZnO; Chemistry; charge transfer; perylene diimide
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Chemistry
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Monti, Oliver L. A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCharge Transfer at Metal Oxide/Organic Interfacesen_US
dc.creatorSchirra, Laura Kristyen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchirra, Laura Kristyen_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractInterfacial charge transfer between metal oxides and organic semiconductors has been found to limit the efficiency of organic optoelectronic devices. Although a number of investigations of inorganic/organic systems exist, very few generally applicable rules for oxide/organic interfaces have been developed and many questions about these systems remain unanswered. Thus the studies presented in this dissertation were designed to improve the understanding of the fundamental interface physics of metal oxide/organic systems. Single molecule fluorescence microscopy was employed to determine the charge transfer mechanism while photoelectron spectroscopy was used to determine the energy level alignment of model systems. Additional computational studies allowed the examination of the properties of the charged organic molecules involved in charge transfer and modeling of the molecule-surface interaction. Calculations of the ground state properties and excited state transitions of the neutral and singly charged states of a modified perylene molecule were performed to provide insight into the orbitals of the initial and final states involved in the interfacial charge transfer process. The design and implementation of a novel UHV single molecule microscope is described. This microscope was used to observe the excited state charge transfer between a modified perylene molecule and Al₂O₃ (0001). The charge transfer mechanism was identified as involving activated trapping and detrapping of the defect derived states within the Al₂O₃ band gap, which resulted in the observation of strongly distributed kinetics for this system. The influence of defects and adsorbates on the electronic structure of ZnO and its interface with organic semiconductors was determined from photoelectron spectroscopy. Modified perylene molecules were found to have strong chemisorptive interactions with the ZnO surface involving charge transfer from defect derived ZnO states to the LUMO, while magnesium phthalocyanine molecules appear to have only weak physisorptive interactions with the ZnO surface. The interfacial investigations of the organic/oxide systems demonstrate the rich defect structure present in metal oxides. In both cases, defects were found to control the interfacial interactions between the metal oxide surface and the modified perylene molecules. Thus the manipulation of these defects states is of fundamental importance for optoelectronic device design.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectphotoelectron spectroscopyen_US
dc.subjectsapphireen_US
dc.subjectsingle moleculeen_US
dc.subjectZnOen_US
dc.subjectChemistryen_US
dc.subjectcharge transferen_US
dc.subjectperylene diimideen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemistryen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMonti, Oliver L. A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCorrales, L. Renéen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSanov, Andreien_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPyun, Jeffreyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMonti, Oliver L. A.en_US
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