Laboratory and Observational Studies of Transient Molecules at Microwave and Millimeter/Submillimeter Wavelengths

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/217089
Title:
Laboratory and Observational Studies of Transient Molecules at Microwave and Millimeter/Submillimeter Wavelengths
Author:
Zack, Lindsay Nicole
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In this dissertation, techniques of high-resolution rotational spectroscopy have been used to measure the spectra of molecules in both laboratory and astronomical settings. In the laboratory, small metal-bearing molecules containing zinc, iron, nickel, titanium, yttrium, and scandium have been studied at microwave and millimeter/submillimeter wavelengths in order to determine their rotational, fine, and hyperfine constants. These molecules were synthesized in situ in direct-absorption and Fourier-transform microwave spectrometers using Broida-type ovens and laser ablation methods. From the spectroscopic parameters, information about fundamental physical propertes and electronic character could be obtained. Radio telescopes were used to measure the spectra of molecules in different interstellar environments. A new molecule, FeCN, was detected toward the circumstellar envelope of the carbon-rich asymtotic giant branch star, IRC+10216, marking the first iron-bearing molecule detected in the interstellar medium. The telescopes were also used to conduct a study of the evolved planetary nebula, NGC 7293, or the Helix Nebula. In the Helix, CO, HCO⁺, and H₂CO were observed at several positions offset from the central star to obtain densities and kinetic temperatures throughout the Helix. A map of the HCO⁺ J = 1→ 0 transition was also constructed, showing that HCO⁺ is widespread throughout the Helix, instead of being photodissociated and destroyed, as theoretical models of planetary nebulae predict.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Radio Astronomy; Rotational Spectroscopy; Transition Metals; Zinc; Chemistry; Astrochemistry; Helix Nebula
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Chemistry
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ziurys, Lucy M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleLaboratory and Observational Studies of Transient Molecules at Microwave and Millimeter/Submillimeter Wavelengthsen_US
dc.creatorZack, Lindsay Nicoleen_US
dc.contributor.authorZack, Lindsay Nicoleen_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this dissertation, techniques of high-resolution rotational spectroscopy have been used to measure the spectra of molecules in both laboratory and astronomical settings. In the laboratory, small metal-bearing molecules containing zinc, iron, nickel, titanium, yttrium, and scandium have been studied at microwave and millimeter/submillimeter wavelengths in order to determine their rotational, fine, and hyperfine constants. These molecules were synthesized in situ in direct-absorption and Fourier-transform microwave spectrometers using Broida-type ovens and laser ablation methods. From the spectroscopic parameters, information about fundamental physical propertes and electronic character could be obtained. Radio telescopes were used to measure the spectra of molecules in different interstellar environments. A new molecule, FeCN, was detected toward the circumstellar envelope of the carbon-rich asymtotic giant branch star, IRC+10216, marking the first iron-bearing molecule detected in the interstellar medium. The telescopes were also used to conduct a study of the evolved planetary nebula, NGC 7293, or the Helix Nebula. In the Helix, CO, HCO⁺, and H₂CO were observed at several positions offset from the central star to obtain densities and kinetic temperatures throughout the Helix. A map of the HCO⁺ J = 1→ 0 transition was also constructed, showing that HCO⁺ is widespread throughout the Helix, instead of being photodissociated and destroyed, as theoretical models of planetary nebulae predict.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectRadio Astronomyen_US
dc.subjectRotational Spectroscopyen_US
dc.subjectTransition Metalsen_US
dc.subjectZincen_US
dc.subjectChemistryen_US
dc.subjectAstrochemistryen_US
dc.subjectHelix Nebulaen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemistryen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorZiurys, Lucy M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKukolich, Stephenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMarrone, Danielen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSanov, Andreien_US
dc.contributor.committeememberZiurys, Lucy M.en_US
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