Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/217049
Title:
Evidence Based Practice Among Primary Care Nurse Practitioners
Author:
Van Roper, Stephen
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study describes primary care nurse practitioner (PCNP) beliefs in, knowledge, implementation and utilization of evidence based practice (EBP). Research questions answered are: 1. What are the levels of belief, implementation, knowledge and utilization of EBP among PCNPs? 2. Is there a relationship with PCNP demographics (personal, professional, and practice), belief, knowledge, implementation and utilization of EBP? 3. Do PCNP demographics (personal, professional, and practice) and scores on belief, knowledge and implementation influence EBP utilization? EBP is considered a standard of care and essential to nurse practitioner practice. The primary advantages of EBP include improved quality of care through the utilization of patient resources, provider resources and experiences, current research and scientific information. However, few studies describe nurse practitioner beliefs, knowledge in EBP and the extent to which this may affect primary care nurse practitioners' (PCNP) utilization of EBP in their practice. Four questionnaires incorporated into one survey were used to examine PCNP beliefs, knowledge, implementation and utilization of EBP. JNC7 guideline knowledge and self-reported use was used to measure EBP utilization. A convenience sample of 202 FNPs, ANPs and GNPs were obtained during the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners National Conference 2011 in Las Vegas, Nevada. PCNPs surveyed were found to have a high level of belief in EBP but did not report implementing EBP more than 3 times in the past 8 weeks. Belief was statistically higher in doctorally prepared PCNPs. Ninety-five percent of the participants were familiar with the JNC7 guideline but the group scored a mean of 69% on knowledge of JNC7 guideline specifics. Only 25% of respondents indicated they utilized guidelines in hypertension management. Future studies should include quantitative and qualitative evaluation of EBP implementation facilitators and obstacles. Findings in this study have provided initial information to better understand PCNPs and EBP.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Primary Care; Nursing; Evidence Based Practice; Nurse Practitioner
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Michaels, Cathy L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEvidence Based Practice Among Primary Care Nurse Practitionersen_US
dc.creatorVan Roper, Stephenen_US
dc.contributor.authorVan Roper, Stephenen_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study describes primary care nurse practitioner (PCNP) beliefs in, knowledge, implementation and utilization of evidence based practice (EBP). Research questions answered are: 1. What are the levels of belief, implementation, knowledge and utilization of EBP among PCNPs? 2. Is there a relationship with PCNP demographics (personal, professional, and practice), belief, knowledge, implementation and utilization of EBP? 3. Do PCNP demographics (personal, professional, and practice) and scores on belief, knowledge and implementation influence EBP utilization? EBP is considered a standard of care and essential to nurse practitioner practice. The primary advantages of EBP include improved quality of care through the utilization of patient resources, provider resources and experiences, current research and scientific information. However, few studies describe nurse practitioner beliefs, knowledge in EBP and the extent to which this may affect primary care nurse practitioners' (PCNP) utilization of EBP in their practice. Four questionnaires incorporated into one survey were used to examine PCNP beliefs, knowledge, implementation and utilization of EBP. JNC7 guideline knowledge and self-reported use was used to measure EBP utilization. A convenience sample of 202 FNPs, ANPs and GNPs were obtained during the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners National Conference 2011 in Las Vegas, Nevada. PCNPs surveyed were found to have a high level of belief in EBP but did not report implementing EBP more than 3 times in the past 8 weeks. Belief was statistically higher in doctorally prepared PCNPs. Ninety-five percent of the participants were familiar with the JNC7 guideline but the group scored a mean of 69% on knowledge of JNC7 guideline specifics. Only 25% of respondents indicated they utilized guidelines in hypertension management. Future studies should include quantitative and qualitative evaluation of EBP implementation facilitators and obstacles. Findings in this study have provided initial information to better understand PCNPs and EBP.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectPrimary Careen_US
dc.subjectNursingen_US
dc.subjectEvidence Based Practiceen_US
dc.subjectNurse Practitioneren_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMichaels, Cathy L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBrewer, Barbaraen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVincent, Deborahen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMichaels, Cathy L.en_US
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