ADOLESCENT ENGAGEMENT WITHIN COMMUNITY-BASED PUBLIC HEALTH EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS AND RESPONSE ORGANIZATIONS: AN ASSESSMENT OF THE MEDICAL RESERVE CORPS

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/216973
Title:
ADOLESCENT ENGAGEMENT WITHIN COMMUNITY-BASED PUBLIC HEALTH EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS AND RESPONSE ORGANIZATIONS: AN ASSESSMENT OF THE MEDICAL RESERVE CORPS
Author:
Dieke, Ada
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Participation in risky behaviors is a common threat to an adolescent's health. Youth engagement (YE), a youth's meaningful and sustained participation in an activity, is a way to help reduce that threat. The Medical Reserve Corps (MRC), a public health emergency preparedness and response organization, has opportunities for engaging youth. However, few adolescents participate in MRC activities, signaling network-wide variations in working with youth. Furthermore, there is a gap in the literature exploring YE in emergency preparedness organizations, including the MRC. The purpose of this dissertation was to better understand youth engagement and development within organizations like these. With the MRC as the example and youth development theories as the lens, YE was examined as well as challenges and benefits of YE, needs, and use of YE strategies within the MRC. An exploratory sequential mixed-methods approach was used to assess YE in the MRC: Phase I- key informant interviews of youth (ages 14-18) and adults in and out of MRC (N=17); and Phase II- a nationwide web-based survey of adult MRC unit leaders (N=215). Qualitative data was analyzed with Microsoft Word and Excel; quantitative data analyzed with Stata 12.0. Results revealed common challenges experienced by MRC units working with youth, including liability concerns. Benefits found include preparation of the youth for future careers and giving youth a focus beyond themselves. A Spearman's correlation found a statistically significant association (r=0.30, N=52, p=0.0288) between the use of the core YE principles and the level of youth participation among the MRC units with youth membership, meaning use of these principles may be helpful in better involving youth. Furthermore, "Building Youth and Adult Capacity" was the top YE principle used among the MRC units that allow youth membership to engage youth. Despite noted challenges, engaging adolescents in the MRC still has many benefits with long-term public health and maternal and child implications for youth in emergency preparedness organizations. These include development of a responsible youth that protects their peers, families, and local communities from public health challenges, positively impacting the community. Recommendations for building student MRC programs across the nation have been provided.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
adolescent health; emergency preparedness and response; maternal and child health; youth engagement; Public Health; adolescent development; adolescent engagement
Degree Name:
D.P.H.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Public Health
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ehiri, John

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleADOLESCENT ENGAGEMENT WITHIN COMMUNITY-BASED PUBLIC HEALTH EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS AND RESPONSE ORGANIZATIONS: AN ASSESSMENT OF THE MEDICAL RESERVE CORPSen_US
dc.creatorDieke, Adaen_US
dc.contributor.authorDieke, Adaen_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractParticipation in risky behaviors is a common threat to an adolescent's health. Youth engagement (YE), a youth's meaningful and sustained participation in an activity, is a way to help reduce that threat. The Medical Reserve Corps (MRC), a public health emergency preparedness and response organization, has opportunities for engaging youth. However, few adolescents participate in MRC activities, signaling network-wide variations in working with youth. Furthermore, there is a gap in the literature exploring YE in emergency preparedness organizations, including the MRC. The purpose of this dissertation was to better understand youth engagement and development within organizations like these. With the MRC as the example and youth development theories as the lens, YE was examined as well as challenges and benefits of YE, needs, and use of YE strategies within the MRC. An exploratory sequential mixed-methods approach was used to assess YE in the MRC: Phase I- key informant interviews of youth (ages 14-18) and adults in and out of MRC (N=17); and Phase II- a nationwide web-based survey of adult MRC unit leaders (N=215). Qualitative data was analyzed with Microsoft Word and Excel; quantitative data analyzed with Stata 12.0. Results revealed common challenges experienced by MRC units working with youth, including liability concerns. Benefits found include preparation of the youth for future careers and giving youth a focus beyond themselves. A Spearman's correlation found a statistically significant association (r=0.30, N=52, p=0.0288) between the use of the core YE principles and the level of youth participation among the MRC units with youth membership, meaning use of these principles may be helpful in better involving youth. Furthermore, "Building Youth and Adult Capacity" was the top YE principle used among the MRC units that allow youth membership to engage youth. Despite noted challenges, engaging adolescents in the MRC still has many benefits with long-term public health and maternal and child implications for youth in emergency preparedness organizations. These include development of a responsible youth that protects their peers, families, and local communities from public health challenges, positively impacting the community. Recommendations for building student MRC programs across the nation have been provided.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectadolescent healthen_US
dc.subjectemergency preparedness and responseen_US
dc.subjectmaternal and child healthen_US
dc.subjectyouth engagementen_US
dc.subjectPublic Healthen_US
dc.subjectadolescent developmenten_US
dc.subjectadolescent engagementen_US
thesis.degree.nameD.P.H.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePublic Healthen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorEhiri, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRoe, Deniseen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTaren, Douglasen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEhiri, Johnen_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.