Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/216646
Title:
Perennial Ryegrass Transition Using Selected Herbicides
Author:
Kopec, David M.; Gilbert, Jeff J.; Nolan, Steve; Pessarakli, Mohammed
Issue Date:
Feb-2009
Publisher:
College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Turfgrass, Landscape and Urban IPM Research Summary
Abstract:
Thirteen herbicide treatments were applied on May 8, 2006, on a golf course fairway to assess transition and turf quality effects. Initial injury to perennial ryegrass was most extreme for Tranxit GTA when applied at 1.0 oz/prod/acre and Katana applied at 2.0 oz/prod/acre. Katana resulted in the total elimination of ryegrass and resulted in a fully necrotic canopy (straw cover) within two weeks after application to July 19, 2006 (72 Days after treatment). The development and persistence of necrotic leaf tissue of perennial ryegrass (straw) had the greatest impact on decreasing overall turfgrass quality ratings. No treatment went through the summer without some loss of quality at some point, including the untreated control. Certainty had little or no effect on transition when applied once at the rate of 1.25 oz/prod/acre. Surflan was not effective in ryegrass transition. The tank mix of Transit and nicosulfuron applied at the rate of 0.25 oz/prod./A each, produced an enhanced transition with nominal quality. In similar fashion, Monument applied at 0.35 oz./A produced an enhanced transition with nominal quality. A rates used in this test, other treatments had either too slow of a transition or had poor and extended low quality turf scores from rapid development of dead ryegrass (straw) and subsequent slow bermudagrass re-establishment. The UTC turf maintained a high percentage of living green ryegrass into the summer and 20% live ryegrass on August 8, 2006 which is roughly six weeks before the next overseeding.
Keywords:
Agriculture -- Arizona; Turfgrasses -- Arizona; Turf management -- Arizona; Plants, ornamental -- Arizona; Turf management -- Spring transition
Series/Report no.:
AZ1487; Series P-155

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titlePerennial Ryegrass Transition Using Selected Herbicidesen_US
dc.contributor.authorKopec, David M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGilbert, Jeff J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNolan, Steveen_US
dc.contributor.authorPessarakli, Mohammeden_US
dc.date.issued2009-02-
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.identifier.journalTurfgrass, Landscape and Urban IPM Research Summaryen_US
dc.description.abstractThirteen herbicide treatments were applied on May 8, 2006, on a golf course fairway to assess transition and turf quality effects. Initial injury to perennial ryegrass was most extreme for Tranxit GTA when applied at 1.0 oz/prod/acre and Katana applied at 2.0 oz/prod/acre. Katana resulted in the total elimination of ryegrass and resulted in a fully necrotic canopy (straw cover) within two weeks after application to July 19, 2006 (72 Days after treatment). The development and persistence of necrotic leaf tissue of perennial ryegrass (straw) had the greatest impact on decreasing overall turfgrass quality ratings. No treatment went through the summer without some loss of quality at some point, including the untreated control. Certainty had little or no effect on transition when applied once at the rate of 1.25 oz/prod/acre. Surflan was not effective in ryegrass transition. The tank mix of Transit and nicosulfuron applied at the rate of 0.25 oz/prod./A each, produced an enhanced transition with nominal quality. In similar fashion, Monument applied at 0.35 oz./A produced an enhanced transition with nominal quality. A rates used in this test, other treatments had either too slow of a transition or had poor and extended low quality turf scores from rapid development of dead ryegrass (straw) and subsequent slow bermudagrass re-establishment. The UTC turf maintained a high percentage of living green ryegrass into the summer and 20% live ryegrass on August 8, 2006 which is roughly six weeks before the next overseeding.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectTurfgrasses -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectTurf management -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectPlants, ornamental -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectTurf management -- Spring transitionen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/216646-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAZ1487en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSeries P-155en_US
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