Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/216554
Title:
Effect of Planting Hole Size and Amendments on Growth and Establishment of Acacia farnesiana
Author:
Schuch, Ursula K.; Kelly, Jack; Stryker, Frank
Issue Date:
Feb-2004
Publisher:
College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Turfgrass, Landscape and Urban IPM Research Summary
Abstract:
The objective of this project was to determine whether the size of planting holes and the addition of organic material in the backfill is beneficial for plant establishment and growth during the early years. Acacia farnesiana were transplanted from containers into a permanent landscape using four methods: large planting hole with or without amendments or a small planting hole with or without amendments. The study was repeated on two sites. Three years following transplanting, plant growth such as height and caliper were not affected by the planting hole size or amendments, but differed significantly between sites. Plants that received more irrigation and were planted in a less rocky soil had greater caliper and were taller than those supplied with less irrigation and planted on a more rocky soil. Visual observations one and three years after transplanting indicate that trees that were amended with compost in the backfill had the highest incidence of leaning trunks and sinking crowns (20% of trees in study or 37% of those receiving amendments) while of those trees that were not amended only one tree (3%) was leaning three years after transplanting. Hole size at transplanting had no significant effect on leaning or sinking three years after transplanting. These results confirm earlier research across the country that 33% to 50% organic amendment in backfill compared to native soil at transplanting is not beneficial for native trees, but increases the risk of leaning or sinking.
Keywords:
Agriculture -- Arizona; Turfgrasses -- Arizona; Turf management -- Arizona; Plants, ornamental -- Arizona; Landscape -- Arizona
Series/Report no.:
Series P-141; AZ1359

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleEffect of Planting Hole Size and Amendments on Growth and Establishment of Acacia farnesianaen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchuch, Ursula K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Jacken_US
dc.contributor.authorStryker, Franken_US
dc.date.issued2004-02-
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.identifier.journalTurfgrass, Landscape and Urban IPM Research Summaryen_US
dc.description.abstractThe objective of this project was to determine whether the size of planting holes and the addition of organic material in the backfill is beneficial for plant establishment and growth during the early years. Acacia farnesiana were transplanted from containers into a permanent landscape using four methods: large planting hole with or without amendments or a small planting hole with or without amendments. The study was repeated on two sites. Three years following transplanting, plant growth such as height and caliper were not affected by the planting hole size or amendments, but differed significantly between sites. Plants that received more irrigation and were planted in a less rocky soil had greater caliper and were taller than those supplied with less irrigation and planted on a more rocky soil. Visual observations one and three years after transplanting indicate that trees that were amended with compost in the backfill had the highest incidence of leaning trunks and sinking crowns (20% of trees in study or 37% of those receiving amendments) while of those trees that were not amended only one tree (3%) was leaning three years after transplanting. Hole size at transplanting had no significant effect on leaning or sinking three years after transplanting. These results confirm earlier research across the country that 33% to 50% organic amendment in backfill compared to native soil at transplanting is not beneficial for native trees, but increases the risk of leaning or sinking.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectTurfgrasses -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectTurf management -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectPlants, ornamental -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectLandscape -- Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/216554-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSeries P-141en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAZ1359en_US
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