Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/216531
Title:
Alternatives for Tree Staking
Author:
Schuch, Ursula K.; Kelly, Jack
Issue Date:
Feb-2004
Publisher:
College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Turfgrass, Landscape and Urban IPM Research Summary
Abstract:
Staking is a common practice following planting of most trees in the landscape. The objectives of this project were to demonstrate four methods of staking trees and the effect on subsequent caliper growth and taper development. Master gardener volunteers were involved in this project. Four methods of staking were used on two different tree species. Acacia stenophylla were 3.1 m tall at planting and were difficult to keep upright with one or two tall stakes. All acacias staked with root stakes or short stakes required corrective pruning to establish a new leader. Prosopis velutina staked with root stakes or short stakes developed greatest taper within 6 months after transplanting. Root stakes will not require removal of staking materials.
Keywords:
Agriculture -- Arizona; Turfgrasses -- Arizona; Turf management -- Arizona; Plants, ornamental -- Arizona; Landscape -- Arizona
Series/Report no.:
Series P-141; AZ1359

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleAlternatives for Tree Stakingen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchuch, Ursula K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Jacken_US
dc.date.issued2004-02-
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.identifier.journalTurfgrass, Landscape and Urban IPM Research Summaryen_US
dc.description.abstractStaking is a common practice following planting of most trees in the landscape. The objectives of this project were to demonstrate four methods of staking trees and the effect on subsequent caliper growth and taper development. Master gardener volunteers were involved in this project. Four methods of staking were used on two different tree species. Acacia stenophylla were 3.1 m tall at planting and were difficult to keep upright with one or two tall stakes. All acacias staked with root stakes or short stakes required corrective pruning to establish a new leader. Prosopis velutina staked with root stakes or short stakes developed greatest taper within 6 months after transplanting. Root stakes will not require removal of staking materials.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectTurfgrasses -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectTurf management -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectPlants, ornamental -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectLandscape -- Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/216531-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSeries P-141en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAZ1359en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.