Initial Investigations of Effectiveness of Cultural Practices to Minimize the Negative Effects of Excessive Thatch on SR1020 Creeping Bentgrass

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/216389
Title:
Initial Investigations of Effectiveness of Cultural Practices to Minimize the Negative Effects of Excessive Thatch on SR1020 Creeping Bentgrass
Author:
Whitlark, Brian S.; Jensen, David; Kopec, David M.
Issue Date:
Sep-2001
Publisher:
College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Turfgrass, Landscape and Urban IPM Research Summary
Abstract:
Increased demand for golf course greens with fast ball speeds and aesthetically pleasing turf present the greatest public pressures that golf course superintendents face today. In the desert southwest, the annual summer monsoon rainfall pattern brings increased atmospheric humidity which results in an increase in the tendency of SR1020 creeping bentgrass to build-up thatch. The effects of four different cultural practices on color, quality, thatch, and ball roll were evaluated on a SR1020 creeping bentgrass green built to USGA specifications grown in an arid environment during a period of increased atmospheric humidity and rainfall. Plots that were verticut/topdress once every two weeks showed unacceptable color, quality, and ball roll. Rolling twice a week had no significant impact on color, quality, and thatch, however, rolling did have a slightly positive impact on ball roll. Grooming three times per week had no significant impact on thatch reduction, and resulted in decreased color, quality and ball speed. Topdressing one time per week did decrease the natural tendency of thatch build-up in SR1020 during periods of increased atmospheric humidity. Topdressing one time per week slightly increased color, quality, and ball roll.
Keywords:
Agriculture -- Arizona; Turfgrasses -- Arizona; Turf management -- Arizona; Plants, ornamental -- Arizona
Series/Report no.:
Series P-126; AZ1246

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleInitial Investigations of Effectiveness of Cultural Practices to Minimize the Negative Effects of Excessive Thatch on SR1020 Creeping Bentgrassen_US
dc.contributor.authorWhitlark, Brian S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorJensen, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.authorKopec, David M.en_US
dc.date.issued2001-09-
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.identifier.journalTurfgrass, Landscape and Urban IPM Research Summaryen_US
dc.description.abstractIncreased demand for golf course greens with fast ball speeds and aesthetically pleasing turf present the greatest public pressures that golf course superintendents face today. In the desert southwest, the annual summer monsoon rainfall pattern brings increased atmospheric humidity which results in an increase in the tendency of SR1020 creeping bentgrass to build-up thatch. The effects of four different cultural practices on color, quality, thatch, and ball roll were evaluated on a SR1020 creeping bentgrass green built to USGA specifications grown in an arid environment during a period of increased atmospheric humidity and rainfall. Plots that were verticut/topdress once every two weeks showed unacceptable color, quality, and ball roll. Rolling twice a week had no significant impact on color, quality, and thatch, however, rolling did have a slightly positive impact on ball roll. Grooming three times per week had no significant impact on thatch reduction, and resulted in decreased color, quality and ball speed. Topdressing one time per week did decrease the natural tendency of thatch build-up in SR1020 during periods of increased atmospheric humidity. Topdressing one time per week slightly increased color, quality, and ball roll.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectTurfgrasses -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectTurf management -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectPlants, ornamental -- Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/216389-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSeries P-126en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAZ1246en_US
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