Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/216367
Title:
Ethephon Potential for Spring Transition of Perennial Ryegrass back to Common Bermudagrass
Author:
Kopec, David M.; Jensen, D. P.; Gilbert, Jeffrey J.
Issue Date:
Sep-2001
Publisher:
College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Turfgrass, Landscape and Urban IPM Research Summary
Abstract:
Spring transition of ryegrass back to the underlying bermudagrass has become problematic for turfgrass managers in the Southwest. This is in part do to increased heat tolerance and shoot densities of newer ryegrass cultivars which predominate the market place. The chemical ethephon (Proxy for turf) was evaluated for use as a plant growth regulator (PGR) to enhance transition from perennial ryegrass to bermudagrass. Proxy was applied at either 5 or 10 ounce rates/1000 square ft, either before, during or after soil moisture stress was imposed on the overseeded turf. On the dates of July 6, 21, 19 and August 9 the greatest visible difference occurred among treatments for percent bermudagrass. These responses were not not statistically significant, however. The greatest transition response was achieved (in general) from Proxy applied at 10 the ounce rate, when applied "pre-stress". This treatment combination generally ranked highest for percent bermudagrass throughout the test. The second most beneficial treatment (in general) was that of Proxy at the 10 ounce rate when applied under "medium stress". From July 21 to August 9 this treatment essentially ranked second for the ryegrass to bermudagrass transition. The third most beneficial treatment (in general) was Proxy applied at the 10 ounce rate , applied "post stress". This treatment was applied the latest in the season ( June 16), which was 22 days after the entire test was fully irrigated (at the start of the test on May 23). Proxy applied "post stress" at the 10 ounce rate excelled in enhancing the ryegrass to bermudagrass transition from July 21 to July 29. When applied at either the 5 or 10 ounce product rates, the "low stress" application treatments had minimal affect for transition. These treatments ranked similar in response to that of the untreated - well watered controls. The "medium" stress plots receiving Proxy exhibited a greater affect on the ryegrass to bermuda transition, depending on the date of bermudagrass evaluation. Further testing should be conducted on lower mowed perennial ryegrass with a more aggressive underlying bermudagrass base, such as the popular Tifway 419.
Keywords:
Agriculture -- Arizona; Turfgrasses -- Arizona; Turf management -- Arizona; Plants, ornamental -- Arizona
Series/Report no.:
Series P-126; AZ1246

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleEthephon Potential for Spring Transition of Perennial Ryegrass back to Common Bermudagrassen_US
dc.contributor.authorKopec, David M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorJensen, D. P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGilbert, Jeffrey J.en_US
dc.date.issued2001-09-
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.identifier.journalTurfgrass, Landscape and Urban IPM Research Summaryen_US
dc.description.abstractSpring transition of ryegrass back to the underlying bermudagrass has become problematic for turfgrass managers in the Southwest. This is in part do to increased heat tolerance and shoot densities of newer ryegrass cultivars which predominate the market place. The chemical ethephon (Proxy for turf) was evaluated for use as a plant growth regulator (PGR) to enhance transition from perennial ryegrass to bermudagrass. Proxy was applied at either 5 or 10 ounce rates/1000 square ft, either before, during or after soil moisture stress was imposed on the overseeded turf. On the dates of July 6, 21, 19 and August 9 the greatest visible difference occurred among treatments for percent bermudagrass. These responses were not not statistically significant, however. The greatest transition response was achieved (in general) from Proxy applied at 10 the ounce rate, when applied "pre-stress". This treatment combination generally ranked highest for percent bermudagrass throughout the test. The second most beneficial treatment (in general) was that of Proxy at the 10 ounce rate when applied under "medium stress". From July 21 to August 9 this treatment essentially ranked second for the ryegrass to bermudagrass transition. The third most beneficial treatment (in general) was Proxy applied at the 10 ounce rate , applied "post stress". This treatment was applied the latest in the season ( June 16), which was 22 days after the entire test was fully irrigated (at the start of the test on May 23). Proxy applied "post stress" at the 10 ounce rate excelled in enhancing the ryegrass to bermudagrass transition from July 21 to July 29. When applied at either the 5 or 10 ounce product rates, the "low stress" application treatments had minimal affect for transition. These treatments ranked similar in response to that of the untreated - well watered controls. The "medium" stress plots receiving Proxy exhibited a greater affect on the ryegrass to bermuda transition, depending on the date of bermudagrass evaluation. Further testing should be conducted on lower mowed perennial ryegrass with a more aggressive underlying bermudagrass base, such as the popular Tifway 419.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectTurfgrasses -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectTurf management -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectPlants, ornamental -- Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/216367-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSeries P-126en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAZ1246en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.