Characterization of Amino Acids and Carbohydrates Found in Whitefly Honeydew As the First Step Toward Bioloical Control

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/216079
Title:
Characterization of Amino Acids and Carbohydrates Found in Whitefly Honeydew As the First Step Toward Bioloical Control
Author:
Byrne, D. N.; Miller, W. B.; Stanghellini, M. E.
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Turfgrass and Ornamentals Research Summary
Abstract:
A Florida strain of sweet potato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), was found to have an expanded range which includes several new food crops. To determine why, we examined how it processes plant nutrients. The amino acid and carbohydrate content of phloem sap of poinsettia and pumpkin and of honeydew produced by the Florida strain and a strain from Arizona feeding on both plants were analyzed. Poinsettia phloem sap contained 15 amino acids; 14 of these were in pumpkin phloem sap. Almost all the same amino acids were in the honeydews produced by the two strains on the two hosts. Approximately half of the amino acids found in the honeydew were at concentrations which were significantly lower than concentrations in the phloem sap. Honeydew from both hosts contain six additional amino acids. The major one was glutamine which may be used to expel nitrogen. Carbohydrates in phloem sap and honeydew were common transport sugars, like sucrose. Both honeydews contained trehalulose, a disaccharide not previously associated with insects. Both strains processed phloem sap and honeydew from both plants in the same manner, but the Florida strain produced significantly larger quantities of honeydew; it is therefore assumed to process more phloem sap. Since this strain has access to more phloem sap it also has access to more of the amino acids which are in short supply in the phloem sap of some plants allowing it to broaden its range.
Keywords:
Agriculture -- Arizona; Turfgrasses -- Arizona; Turf management -- Arizona; Plants, ornamental -- Arizona
Series/Report no.:
Series P-80; 370080

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleCharacterization of Amino Acids and Carbohydrates Found in Whitefly Honeydew As the First Step Toward Bioloical Controlen_US
dc.contributor.authorByrne, D. N.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMiller, W. B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorStanghellini, M. E.en_US
dc.date.issued1989-
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.identifier.journalTurfgrass and Ornamentals Research Summaryen_US
dc.description.abstractA Florida strain of sweet potato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), was found to have an expanded range which includes several new food crops. To determine why, we examined how it processes plant nutrients. The amino acid and carbohydrate content of phloem sap of poinsettia and pumpkin and of honeydew produced by the Florida strain and a strain from Arizona feeding on both plants were analyzed. Poinsettia phloem sap contained 15 amino acids; 14 of these were in pumpkin phloem sap. Almost all the same amino acids were in the honeydews produced by the two strains on the two hosts. Approximately half of the amino acids found in the honeydew were at concentrations which were significantly lower than concentrations in the phloem sap. Honeydew from both hosts contain six additional amino acids. The major one was glutamine which may be used to expel nitrogen. Carbohydrates in phloem sap and honeydew were common transport sugars, like sucrose. Both honeydews contained trehalulose, a disaccharide not previously associated with insects. Both strains processed phloem sap and honeydew from both plants in the same manner, but the Florida strain produced significantly larger quantities of honeydew; it is therefore assumed to process more phloem sap. Since this strain has access to more phloem sap it also has access to more of the amino acids which are in short supply in the phloem sap of some plants allowing it to broaden its range.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectTurfgrasses -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectTurf management -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectPlants, ornamental -- Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/216079-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSeries P-80en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries370080en_US
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