Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/215860
Title:
Rooting of Stem Cuttings of Mortonia scabrella
Author:
Palzkill, D. A.; DePaul, L.
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Turfgrass and Ornamentals Research Summary
Abstract:
Mortonia scabrella can be successfully propagated by stem -tip cuttings during May to September. Better rooting seems to occur during the less stressful months of May and September than in mid-summer. A wide range of rooting response occurs between different clones; the best will root in the range of 70-80%, which should be acceptable in a commercial propagation situation. In one cycle of selection in which the best 3 out of 16 clones were selected for a repeat study, average rooting success increased from 6% to 33 %. Apparently genetic differences for rooting potential occur. Further selection from larger populations, and/or breeding for this trait should result in cutting propagation becoming relatively easy for this species.
Keywords:
Agriculture -- Arizona; Turfgrasses -- Arizona; Turf management -- Arizona; Plants, ornamental -- Arizona; Ornamental horticulture research -- Arizona; Ornamental horticulture research -- Propogation/production
Series/Report no.:
Series P-75; 370075

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleRooting of Stem Cuttings of Mortonia scabrellaen_US
dc.contributor.authorPalzkill, D. A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDePaul, L.en_US
dc.date.issued1988-
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.identifier.journalTurfgrass and Ornamentals Research Summaryen_US
dc.description.abstractMortonia scabrella can be successfully propagated by stem -tip cuttings during May to September. Better rooting seems to occur during the less stressful months of May and September than in mid-summer. A wide range of rooting response occurs between different clones; the best will root in the range of 70-80%, which should be acceptable in a commercial propagation situation. In one cycle of selection in which the best 3 out of 16 clones were selected for a repeat study, average rooting success increased from 6% to 33 %. Apparently genetic differences for rooting potential occur. Further selection from larger populations, and/or breeding for this trait should result in cutting propagation becoming relatively easy for this species.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectTurfgrasses -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectTurf management -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectPlants, ornamental -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectOrnamental horticulture research -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectOrnamental horticulture research -- Propogation/productionen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/215860-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSeries P-75en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries370075en_US
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