Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/215411
Title:
Race and the Matrix Movie Trilogy
Author:
Sanchez, Tani Dianca
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Dissertation Not Available (per Author's Request) / University of Arizona affiliates can find this item in the ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Full-text Database
Abstract:
Using a close textual and contextual analysis, I trace themes of gender and race in the Matrix trilogy, arguing for the presence of a parallel, embedded filmic narrative, one that neatly aligns with African-American critical traditions affirming subjugated ideologies, knowledges, communities and forms. Decoding the films through the lenses of race, womanist, film studies and cultural studies theories, I explore this signified, covert storyline through phenotypes, casting choices, plot twists, and extra filmic events. In this dissertation project, I argue that their preponderance, consistency, and coherence are evidence of deliberate commentary. I further claim that that the trilogy can be reasonably understood as a historically motivated critique of Whiteness and White supremacy, offering references to American slavery and ideologies, as well as to cross-racial ideological domination and collective, coalitional and revolutionary change. Since long standing racial and gender understandings (along with their attendant domination and oppression) persist, examining popular films with transformed constructions is useful in supporting frameworks for conceptual change.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Comparative Cultural & Literary Studies; race; whiteness; womanism; motion pictures and film; matrix movies; black ideology
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Comparative Cultural and Literary Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Babcock, Barbara A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleRace and the Matrix Movie Trilogyen_US
dc.creatorSanchez, Tani Diancaen_US
dc.contributor.authorSanchez, Tani Diancaen_US
dc.date.issued2006en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseDissertation Not Available (per Author's Request) / University of Arizona affiliates can find this item in the ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Full-text Databaseen_US
dc.description.abstractUsing a close textual and contextual analysis, I trace themes of gender and race in the Matrix trilogy, arguing for the presence of a parallel, embedded filmic narrative, one that neatly aligns with African-American critical traditions affirming subjugated ideologies, knowledges, communities and forms. Decoding the films through the lenses of race, womanist, film studies and cultural studies theories, I explore this signified, covert storyline through phenotypes, casting choices, plot twists, and extra filmic events. In this dissertation project, I argue that their preponderance, consistency, and coherence are evidence of deliberate commentary. I further claim that that the trilogy can be reasonably understood as a historically motivated critique of Whiteness and White supremacy, offering references to American slavery and ideologies, as well as to cross-racial ideological domination and collective, coalitional and revolutionary change. Since long standing racial and gender understandings (along with their attendant domination and oppression) persist, examining popular films with transformed constructions is useful in supporting frameworks for conceptual change.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectComparative Cultural & Literary Studiesen_US
dc.subjectraceen_US
dc.subjectwhitenessen_US
dc.subjectwomanismen_US
dc.subjectmotion pictures and filmen_US
dc.subjectmatrix moviesen_US
dc.subjectblack ideologyen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineComparative Cultural and Literary Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairBabcock, Barbara A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBernardi, Danielen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLeSeur, Getaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSmith, Howarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSmith-Shomade, Berettaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWhaley, Deborahen_US
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