Detection of Lettuce Infectious Yellow Virus (LIYV) in Greenhouse and Field Inoculated Plots Using an Indirect Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (Indirect ELISA)

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/214278
Title:
Detection of Lettuce Infectious Yellow Virus (LIYV) in Greenhouse and Field Inoculated Plots Using an Indirect Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (Indirect ELISA)
Author:
Brown, Judith K.; Poulos, Bonnie T.; Costa, Heather S.; Nelson, Merritt R.
Issue Date:
May-1989
Publisher:
College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Vegetable Report
Abstract:
Lettuce infectious yellows virus (LIYV), a recently recognized plant virus, causes dramatic yellowing symptoms and severe diseases in a wide range of vegetable crops in Arizona, adjacent southwestern states and Mexico. Until now, the only available diagnostic method was a time-consuming bioassay that used the insect vector to transmit the virus, with subsequent manipulation of indicator plants. A rapid, sensitive diagnostic technique (termed an indirect enzyme-linked immunoassay, called indirect ELISA) system was developed to detect lettuce infectious yellows virus (LIYV) in infected plant material. A virus specific antibody was made to viral capsid protein which was purified by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The indirect ELISA system was optimized and used to detect viral antigen in greenhouse-inoculated melons. The system was subsequently adapted to detect LIYV in symptomatic and asymptomatic weed and cultivated plant species collected from infected fields near Yuma and in central Arizona. The indirect ELISA system described here allows for the detection of approximately 100 ng of virus per well. The LIYV was detectable in symptomatic (but not in asymptomatic) leaves of melon plants infected with the virus. In contrast, the virus could be detected in both symptomatic and symptomless cheeseweed plants collected in the field. The optical density readings for infected weed species were generally lower than those for cultivated species, such as melons, lettuce, and spinach, suggesting that there is less virus in the weed hosts tested than in infected, cultivated hosts.
Keywords:
Agriculture -- Arizona; Vegetables -- Arizona; Lettuce -- Arizona
Series/Report no.:
Series P-78; 370078

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleDetection of Lettuce Infectious Yellow Virus (LIYV) in Greenhouse and Field Inoculated Plots Using an Indirect Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (Indirect ELISA)en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Judith K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPoulos, Bonnie T.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCosta, Heather S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNelson, Merritt R.en_US
dc.date.issued1989-05-
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.identifier.journalVegetable Reporten_US
dc.description.abstractLettuce infectious yellows virus (LIYV), a recently recognized plant virus, causes dramatic yellowing symptoms and severe diseases in a wide range of vegetable crops in Arizona, adjacent southwestern states and Mexico. Until now, the only available diagnostic method was a time-consuming bioassay that used the insect vector to transmit the virus, with subsequent manipulation of indicator plants. A rapid, sensitive diagnostic technique (termed an indirect enzyme-linked immunoassay, called indirect ELISA) system was developed to detect lettuce infectious yellows virus (LIYV) in infected plant material. A virus specific antibody was made to viral capsid protein which was purified by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The indirect ELISA system was optimized and used to detect viral antigen in greenhouse-inoculated melons. The system was subsequently adapted to detect LIYV in symptomatic and asymptomatic weed and cultivated plant species collected from infected fields near Yuma and in central Arizona. The indirect ELISA system described here allows for the detection of approximately 100 ng of virus per well. The LIYV was detectable in symptomatic (but not in asymptomatic) leaves of melon plants infected with the virus. In contrast, the virus could be detected in both symptomatic and symptomless cheeseweed plants collected in the field. The optical density readings for infected weed species were generally lower than those for cultivated species, such as melons, lettuce, and spinach, suggesting that there is less virus in the weed hosts tested than in infected, cultivated hosts.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectVegetables -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectLettuce -- Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/214278-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSeries P-78en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries370078en_US
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