Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/213859
Title:
Response of Dry Onions to Varying Levels of Soil Moisture
Author:
Pew, W. D.
Issue Date:
Aug-1965
Publisher:
College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Vegetables: A College of Agriculture Report
Abstract:
Onions respond favorably to increasing levels of soil moisture as measured by increase in bulb size and total yields. Maintaining a soil moisture level of 18-20 centibars of tension (nearly field-holding capacity) produces the greatest yields of bulbs. However, dry onions so produced are somewhat softer in texture, tended toward thick -neck growth, matured slower, and are more difficult to cure adequately in the normal length of time. Onions grown on lesser amounts of water tend to have the reverse characteristics. Costs of production are similarly increased under high soil moisture levels because of the need for replacing nitrogen leached out of the root zone. Also, the costs of the water and its application must be increased. Therefore, the economics involved would be a required consideration.
Keywords:
Agriculture -- Arizona; Vegetables -- Arizona
Series/Report no.:
Series P-2; 370002

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleResponse of Dry Onions to Varying Levels of Soil Moistureen_US
dc.contributor.authorPew, W. D.en_US
dc.date.issued1965-08-
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.identifier.journalVegetables: A College of Agriculture Reporten_US
dc.description.abstractOnions respond favorably to increasing levels of soil moisture as measured by increase in bulb size and total yields. Maintaining a soil moisture level of 18-20 centibars of tension (nearly field-holding capacity) produces the greatest yields of bulbs. However, dry onions so produced are somewhat softer in texture, tended toward thick -neck growth, matured slower, and are more difficult to cure adequately in the normal length of time. Onions grown on lesser amounts of water tend to have the reverse characteristics. Costs of production are similarly increased under high soil moisture levels because of the need for replacing nitrogen leached out of the root zone. Also, the costs of the water and its application must be increased. Therefore, the economics involved would be a required consideration.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectVegetables -- Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/213859-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSeries P-2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries370002en_US
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