Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/211315
Title:
Effects of High Frequency Irrigation on Irrigation Uniformity III
Author:
Martin, E. C.; Laine, G.; Sheedy, M.
Affiliation:
University of Arizona, Cooperative Extension
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Cotton: A College of Agriculture Report
Abstract:
Data was collected for a third season to determine the effects of high frequency irrigation on irrigation uniformity in cotton production. The past two seasons indicated that high frequency irrigation worked better on sandier soils than soils containing high clay contents. Although no significant differences were found, higher yields were obtained on a site with a relatively high sand content. A field located at the Maricopa Agricultural Center was split into two treatments. Treatment 1 was irrigated at approximately 35% depletion of available water in the plant rootzone. Treatment 2 was irrigated at approximately 50% depletion in the crop rootzone. Although the yield data from Treatment 1 was higher on the average, statistically, there was no difference between the two treatments.
Keywords:
Agriculture -- Arizona; Cotton -- Arizona; Cotton -- Irrigation
Series/Report no.:
AZ1224; Series P-125

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleEffects of High Frequency Irrigation on Irrigation Uniformity IIIen_US
dc.contributor.authorMartin, E. C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLaine, G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSheedy, M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizona, Cooperative Extensionen_US
dc.date.issued2001-
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.identifier.journalCotton: A College of Agriculture Reporten_US
dc.description.abstractData was collected for a third season to determine the effects of high frequency irrigation on irrigation uniformity in cotton production. The past two seasons indicated that high frequency irrigation worked better on sandier soils than soils containing high clay contents. Although no significant differences were found, higher yields were obtained on a site with a relatively high sand content. A field located at the Maricopa Agricultural Center was split into two treatments. Treatment 1 was irrigated at approximately 35% depletion of available water in the plant rootzone. Treatment 2 was irrigated at approximately 50% depletion in the crop rootzone. Although the yield data from Treatment 1 was higher on the average, statistically, there was no difference between the two treatments.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Irrigationen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/211315-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAZ1224en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSeries P-125en_US
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