Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/211310
Title:
Evaluation of Crop Management Effects on Fiber Micronaire, 2000
Author:
Silvertooth, J. C.; Galadima, A.; Norton, E. R.; Tronstad, R.
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Cotton: A College of Agriculture Report
Abstract:
Arizona has experienced a trend toward increasing fiber micronaire values in recent years resulting in substantial discounts on fiber value. There is some evidence to suggest management can impact fiber micronaire. Approximately 250 cases were identified in cotton production areas in Arizona ranging from the lower Colorado River Valley to near 2,000 ft. elevation with grower cooperators in the 2000 season. Field records were developed for each field by use of the University of Arizona Cotton Monitoring System (UA-CMS) for points such as variety, planting date, fertility management, irrigation schedules, irrigation termination, defoliation, etc. Routine plant measurements were conducted to monitor crop growth and development and to identify fruiting patterns and retention through the season. As the crop has approached cutout and the lower bolls began to open, open boll samples have been collected from the lowest four, first position bolls (theoretically the bolls with the highest micronaire potential on the plant) from 10 plants, ginned, and the fiber analyzed for micronaire (low 4). From that point forward, total boll counts per unit area and percent open boll measurements are being made on 14-day intervals until the crop is defoliated. Following defoliation, final plant maps were performed. Relationships among low 4 samples micronaire, irrigation termination (IT), defoliation, and final crop micronaire were analyzed.
Keywords:
Agriculture -- Arizona; Cotton -- Arizona; Cotton -- Crop management
Series/Report no.:
AZ1224; Series P-125

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleEvaluation of Crop Management Effects on Fiber Micronaire, 2000en_US
dc.contributor.authorSilvertooth, J. C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGaladima, A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNorton, E. R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTronstad, R.en_US
dc.date.issued2001-
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.identifier.journalCotton: A College of Agriculture Reporten_US
dc.description.abstractArizona has experienced a trend toward increasing fiber micronaire values in recent years resulting in substantial discounts on fiber value. There is some evidence to suggest management can impact fiber micronaire. Approximately 250 cases were identified in cotton production areas in Arizona ranging from the lower Colorado River Valley to near 2,000 ft. elevation with grower cooperators in the 2000 season. Field records were developed for each field by use of the University of Arizona Cotton Monitoring System (UA-CMS) for points such as variety, planting date, fertility management, irrigation schedules, irrigation termination, defoliation, etc. Routine plant measurements were conducted to monitor crop growth and development and to identify fruiting patterns and retention through the season. As the crop has approached cutout and the lower bolls began to open, open boll samples have been collected from the lowest four, first position bolls (theoretically the bolls with the highest micronaire potential on the plant) from 10 plants, ginned, and the fiber analyzed for micronaire (low 4). From that point forward, total boll counts per unit area and percent open boll measurements are being made on 14-day intervals until the crop is defoliated. Following defoliation, final plant maps were performed. Relationships among low 4 samples micronaire, irrigation termination (IT), defoliation, and final crop micronaire were analyzed.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Crop managementen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/211310-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAZ1224en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSeries P-125en_US
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