Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/210368
Title:
Lygus Chemical Control: Are Combinations Sprays Worth It?
Author:
Ellsworth, Peter C.; Gibson, R.; Howell, D.; Husman, S.; Stedman, S.; Tickes, B.
Issue Date:
Apr-1998
Publisher:
College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Cotton: A College of Agriculture Report
Abstract:
We need efficient sampling methods, appropriate thresholds based on a well -defined Lygus density yield relationship, and knowledge of the most effective chemical controls available. Insecticides were evaluated for control of Lygus at 5 'at risk' grower locations, as well as at 4 other experimental sites. Application methods were different at each site according to grower practice or experimental protocol (5-20 GPA; by ground, air, or electrostatically-assisted ground sprayers). Evaluations were made based on the number of Lygus per 100 sweeps. Orthene®, Vydate® or to a lesser degree, Monitor® used alone and at high rates appeared to perform adequately at all sites. Both rates of Regent™, a new chemistry under development by Rhône- Poulenc, provided excellent levels of control comparable to Orthene in a high density test. In this same test, none of the experimental and registered pyrethmids provided adequate control when used alone. Thiodan®, when mixed with Mustang®, provided some level of control. Over all tests measured for yield, a positive net return was possible with no more than 2 sprays of solo materials which yielded between 0.3 and 0.5 bales/A more than untreated comparisons or between $51-130/A net return. Also, at one site where yields were in excess of 4.2 bales/A, optimum planting and fruit-set prior to heavy Lygus pressures and monsoon-associated heat stress was an important cultural tactic for avoiding losses to Lygus - the check yielded over 3.7 bales /A! As seen at grower sites and confirmed in experimental studies, solo compounds, at appropriate rates, performed as well or better than any combination tested. And, mixtures at this time do not appear to provide any additive, synergistic or economic benefits in the control of Lygus. Combinations, unless indicated by another pest problem (e.g., whiteflies), are not "worth it," and needlessly expose the grower to larger input costs, "empty" applications, and higher risks of resistance, pest resurgence, secondary pest outbreaks, and phytotoxic effects by insecticides.
Keywords:
Agriculture -- Arizona; Cotton -- Arizona; Cotton -- Insect investigations
Series/Report no.:
AZ1006

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleLygus Chemical Control: Are Combinations Sprays Worth It?en_US
dc.contributor.authorEllsworth, Peter C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGibson, R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHowell, D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHusman, S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorStedman, S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTickes, B.en_US
dc.date.issued1998-04-
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.identifier.journalCotton: A College of Agriculture Reporten_US
dc.description.abstractWe need efficient sampling methods, appropriate thresholds based on a well -defined Lygus density yield relationship, and knowledge of the most effective chemical controls available. Insecticides were evaluated for control of Lygus at 5 'at risk' grower locations, as well as at 4 other experimental sites. Application methods were different at each site according to grower practice or experimental protocol (5-20 GPA; by ground, air, or electrostatically-assisted ground sprayers). Evaluations were made based on the number of Lygus per 100 sweeps. Orthene®, Vydate® or to a lesser degree, Monitor® used alone and at high rates appeared to perform adequately at all sites. Both rates of Regent™, a new chemistry under development by Rhône- Poulenc, provided excellent levels of control comparable to Orthene in a high density test. In this same test, none of the experimental and registered pyrethmids provided adequate control when used alone. Thiodan®, when mixed with Mustang®, provided some level of control. Over all tests measured for yield, a positive net return was possible with no more than 2 sprays of solo materials which yielded between 0.3 and 0.5 bales/A more than untreated comparisons or between $51-130/A net return. Also, at one site where yields were in excess of 4.2 bales/A, optimum planting and fruit-set prior to heavy Lygus pressures and monsoon-associated heat stress was an important cultural tactic for avoiding losses to Lygus - the check yielded over 3.7 bales /A! As seen at grower sites and confirmed in experimental studies, solo compounds, at appropriate rates, performed as well or better than any combination tested. And, mixtures at this time do not appear to provide any additive, synergistic or economic benefits in the control of Lygus. Combinations, unless indicated by another pest problem (e.g., whiteflies), are not "worth it," and needlessly expose the grower to larger input costs, "empty" applications, and higher risks of resistance, pest resurgence, secondary pest outbreaks, and phytotoxic effects by insecticides.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Insect investigationsen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/210368-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAZ1006en_US
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