Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/210363
Title:
Can Resistance to Chloronicotynl Insecticides be Averted in Arizona Field Crops?
Author:
Williams, Livy III; Denney, Timothy J.; Palumbo, John C.
Affiliation:
Department of Entomology, The University of Arizona; Extension Arthropod Resistance Management Laboratory, Tucson, AZ; Yuma Agricultural Center, Yuma, AZ
Issue Date:
Apr-1998
Publisher:
College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Cotton: A College of Agriculture Report
Abstract:
A resistance management program was initiated in Arizona in 1995, the initial goal of which was to sustain the efficacy of imidacloprid (Admire®) against Bemisia in vegetable crops. Due to the anticipated registration of additional chloronicotinyl (and related neonicotinyl) insecticides in Arizona, project objectives were subsequently broadened to address management of this entire class of insecticides in Arizona field crops. Results from three years of statewide monitoring of whiteflies from cotton indicated that whitefly populations in Arizona have become significantly less susceptible to imidacloprid in each of the past two years and significant geographical differences were described. However, no evidence was found of reduced field performance of imidacloprid in vegetables. Additionally, laboratory studies subjecting Arizona whiteflies to selection with imidacloprid did not increase levels of resistance beyond those occurring in the field. A study exploring the influence of cropping system differences on imidacloprid use (Admire® and Provado®) revealed no major differences in susceptibility to this insecticide between populations of whiteflies in central and southwestern Arizona. However, distinct seasonal shifts to lower susceptibility from 1996 to 1997 were observed in the Dome Valley of southwestern Arizona. Susceptibility of Arizona whitefly populations to imidacloprid was highly correlated with susceptibility to acetamiprid but was unrelated to susceptibility to CGA-293343. There is an urgent need to harmonize chemical use and resistance management efforts in Arizona cotton, vegetables and melons to avoid conflicts resulting from movement of pests between crops.
Keywords:
Cotton -- Arizona; Agriculture -- Arizona; Cotton -- Insect investigations
Series/Report no.:
AZ1006

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleCan Resistance to Chloronicotynl Insecticides be Averted in Arizona Field Crops?en_US
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Livy IIIen_US
dc.contributor.authorDenney, Timothy J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPalumbo, John C.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Entomology, The University of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentExtension Arthropod Resistance Management Laboratory, Tucson, AZen_US
dc.contributor.departmentYuma Agricultural Center, Yuma, AZen_US
dc.date.issued1998-04-
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.identifier.journalCotton: A College of Agriculture Reporten_US
dc.description.abstractA resistance management program was initiated in Arizona in 1995, the initial goal of which was to sustain the efficacy of imidacloprid (Admire®) against Bemisia in vegetable crops. Due to the anticipated registration of additional chloronicotinyl (and related neonicotinyl) insecticides in Arizona, project objectives were subsequently broadened to address management of this entire class of insecticides in Arizona field crops. Results from three years of statewide monitoring of whiteflies from cotton indicated that whitefly populations in Arizona have become significantly less susceptible to imidacloprid in each of the past two years and significant geographical differences were described. However, no evidence was found of reduced field performance of imidacloprid in vegetables. Additionally, laboratory studies subjecting Arizona whiteflies to selection with imidacloprid did not increase levels of resistance beyond those occurring in the field. A study exploring the influence of cropping system differences on imidacloprid use (Admire® and Provado®) revealed no major differences in susceptibility to this insecticide between populations of whiteflies in central and southwestern Arizona. However, distinct seasonal shifts to lower susceptibility from 1996 to 1997 were observed in the Dome Valley of southwestern Arizona. Susceptibility of Arizona whitefly populations to imidacloprid was highly correlated with susceptibility to acetamiprid but was unrelated to susceptibility to CGA-293343. There is an urgent need to harmonize chemical use and resistance management efforts in Arizona cotton, vegetables and melons to avoid conflicts resulting from movement of pests between crops.en_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Insect investigationsen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/210363-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAZ1006en_US
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