Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/210303
Title:
Fruiting Distribution Patterns among Three Cotton Varieties under Irrigated Conditions
Author:
Ozuna, S. E.; Silvertooth, J. C.
Issue Date:
Apr-1998
Publisher:
College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Cotton: A College of Agriculture Report
Abstract:
A field experiment was conducted at the UA Maricopa Agricultural Center (MAC) to determine the fruiting distribution patterns of two commonly grown Upland cultivars, DP 33b and DP 5415, and one American Pima cultivar, Pima S-7. Results indicate that cotton plants (G. hirsutum L. and G. barbadense L.) produce total yield at fruiting branches one through 18, with the majority of yield occurring at fruiting branches one through 12. Among fruiting branches one through 12, the majority of yield is occurring at fruiting positions one and two. These results indicate that the bulk of the yield is produced early in the season and declines as the season progresses
Keywords:
Agriculture -- Arizona; Cotton -- Arizona; Cotton -- Physiology; Cotton -- Growth regulators
Series/Report no.:
AZ1006

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleFruiting Distribution Patterns among Three Cotton Varieties under Irrigated Conditionsen_US
dc.contributor.authorOzuna, S. E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSilvertooth, J. C.en_US
dc.date.issued1998-04-
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.identifier.journalCotton: A College of Agriculture Reporten_US
dc.description.abstractA field experiment was conducted at the UA Maricopa Agricultural Center (MAC) to determine the fruiting distribution patterns of two commonly grown Upland cultivars, DP 33b and DP 5415, and one American Pima cultivar, Pima S-7. Results indicate that cotton plants (G. hirsutum L. and G. barbadense L.) produce total yield at fruiting branches one through 18, with the majority of yield occurring at fruiting branches one through 12. Among fruiting branches one through 12, the majority of yield is occurring at fruiting positions one and two. These results indicate that the bulk of the yield is produced early in the season and declines as the season progressesen_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Physiologyen_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Growth regulatorsen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/210303-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAZ1006en_US
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