The Interaction and Effects of Soil Moisture Regime and Yellow Nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus) Density on Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) Growth

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/210293
Title:
The Interaction and Effects of Soil Moisture Regime and Yellow Nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus) Density on Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) Growth
Author:
Moffett, Jody E.; McCloskey, William B.; Husman, Stephen H.; Dixon, Gary L.
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona; Cooperative Extension, Maricopa County, Phoenix, Arizona
Issue Date:
Mar-1995
Publisher:
College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Cotton: A College of Agriculture Report
Abstract:
The goal of our research is to determine the effects of yellow nutsedge competition on cotton and to examine how the competitive relationship between these two species is modulated by soil moisture. In support of this goal, a competition experiment with various nutsedge densities and three irrigation regimes was conducted at the University of Arizona, Maricopa Agricultural Center. The results of this study indicate that increasing nutsedge density caused a significant linear decrease in cotton seed yield in both 1993 (p=0.03) and 1994 (p=0.002). The cotton yield reductions caused by the highest nutsedge densities, 33 and 50 tubers /m of crop row in 1993 and 1994, respectively, were 13.5 and 15.5 percent, respectively. Stem biomass, an indicator of total above ground biomass, increased significantly with increasing soil moisture. There was also a trend of increasing seed cotton yield with increasing soil moisture with the wet treatment (i.e., irrigation at 35 percent soil moisture depletion) resulting in the highest biomass and yields. In 1994 this trend was significant (p=0.0001) but in 1993 it was not (p=0.098) probably because fewer replications were used in 1993. An important goal of this research was to determine if cotton, with its deeper tap root type of root architecture, is more competitive against yellow nutsedge, which has a fibrous root system, when irrigation is less frequent. However, analysis of variance showed that there was no significant interaction between soil moisture availability and seed cotton yield reductions caused by nutsedge competition in either 1993 (p=0.44) or 1994 (p=0.62).
Keywords:
Agriculture -- Arizona; Cotton -- Arizona; Cotton -- Weed control
Series/Report no.:
370099; Series P-99

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleThe Interaction and Effects of Soil Moisture Regime and Yellow Nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus) Density on Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) Growthen_US
dc.contributor.authorMoffett, Jody E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcCloskey, William B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHusman, Stephen H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDixon, Gary L.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Plant Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentCooperative Extension, Maricopa County, Phoenix, Arizonaen_US
dc.date.issued1995-03-
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.identifier.journalCotton: A College of Agriculture Reporten_US
dc.description.abstractThe goal of our research is to determine the effects of yellow nutsedge competition on cotton and to examine how the competitive relationship between these two species is modulated by soil moisture. In support of this goal, a competition experiment with various nutsedge densities and three irrigation regimes was conducted at the University of Arizona, Maricopa Agricultural Center. The results of this study indicate that increasing nutsedge density caused a significant linear decrease in cotton seed yield in both 1993 (p=0.03) and 1994 (p=0.002). The cotton yield reductions caused by the highest nutsedge densities, 33 and 50 tubers /m of crop row in 1993 and 1994, respectively, were 13.5 and 15.5 percent, respectively. Stem biomass, an indicator of total above ground biomass, increased significantly with increasing soil moisture. There was also a trend of increasing seed cotton yield with increasing soil moisture with the wet treatment (i.e., irrigation at 35 percent soil moisture depletion) resulting in the highest biomass and yields. In 1994 this trend was significant (p=0.0001) but in 1993 it was not (p=0.098) probably because fewer replications were used in 1993. An important goal of this research was to determine if cotton, with its deeper tap root type of root architecture, is more competitive against yellow nutsedge, which has a fibrous root system, when irrigation is less frequent. However, analysis of variance showed that there was no significant interaction between soil moisture availability and seed cotton yield reductions caused by nutsedge competition in either 1993 (p=0.44) or 1994 (p=0.62).en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Weed controlen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/210293-
dc.relation.ispartofseries370099en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSeries P-99en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.