Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/209649
Title:
Nitrogen, Phosphorus, and Potassium Uptake by Upland and Pima Cotton
Author:
Unruh, B. L.; Silvertooth, J. C.; Steger, A. J.; Norton, E. R.
Issue Date:
Mar-1994
Publisher:
College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Cotton: A College of Agriculture Report
Abstract:
Several investigations of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) uptake by Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) have been conduced, however no investigations of this type have included American Pima cotton (G. barbadense L.). We conducted a study to describe the total N, P, and K uptake and the partitioning of each nutrient into various plant parts for both Upland and Pima cotton. During the growing seasons of 1990, 1991, and 1992 at two south-central Arizona locations, both Upland (var. DPL 90) and Pima (var. S-6) cotton were grown. Beginning 14 to 20 d after emergence, whole cotton plants were removed and cotton plants were separated into stems, leaves (including petioles), burs (carpel walls), lint, and seeds. The bur fraction, also included squares, flowers, immature bolls, and burs from mature bolls. The appropriate analyses for total N, P, and K were determined on each fraction (except lint). Regression analyses was used to model nutrient uptake as a function of both days after planting (DAP) and heat units after planting (HUAP). Regression analyses indicated that HUAP was equally good, and in most cases superior to using DAP to model total nutrient uptake and partitioning within both Upland and Pima cotton. In every case there was close agreement between the predicted and actual total nutrient uptake. For Upland cotton the actual total N, P, and K uptake was 199, 29, and 250 kg ha⁻¹ and the predicted total N, P, and K uptake was 199, 29, and 255 kg ha⁻¹, respectively. For Pima cotton the actual total N, P, and K uptake was 196, 29, and 215 kg ha⁻¹ and the predicted was 210, 29, and 229 kg ha⁻¹, respectively. The pattern of nutrient partitioning in Upland cotton were similar to the findings of others and Pima showed the same general patterns of partitioning as Upland cotton. Seeds were a major sink of nutrients. Nutrient uptake in seeds resulted in decreasing uptake in leaves and stems. Presumably, due to mobilization of nutrients from those parts to the seeds during seed development. The nutrient requirements to produce 100 kg lint ha' for Upland cotton was 15, 2.2, and 19 kg ha⁻¹ for N, P, and K, respectively and was 20, 3.0, and 22 kg ha⁻¹, respectively for Pima cotton.
Keywords:
Agriculture -- Arizona; Cotton -- Arizona; Cotton -- Soil fertility; Cotton -- Soil management
Series/Report no.:
370096; Series P-96

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleNitrogen, Phosphorus, and Potassium Uptake by Upland and Pima Cottonen_US
dc.contributor.authorUnruh, B. L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSilvertooth, J. C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSteger, A. J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNorton, E. R.en_US
dc.date.issued1994-03-
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.identifier.journalCotton: A College of Agriculture Reporten_US
dc.description.abstractSeveral investigations of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) uptake by Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) have been conduced, however no investigations of this type have included American Pima cotton (G. barbadense L.). We conducted a study to describe the total N, P, and K uptake and the partitioning of each nutrient into various plant parts for both Upland and Pima cotton. During the growing seasons of 1990, 1991, and 1992 at two south-central Arizona locations, both Upland (var. DPL 90) and Pima (var. S-6) cotton were grown. Beginning 14 to 20 d after emergence, whole cotton plants were removed and cotton plants were separated into stems, leaves (including petioles), burs (carpel walls), lint, and seeds. The bur fraction, also included squares, flowers, immature bolls, and burs from mature bolls. The appropriate analyses for total N, P, and K were determined on each fraction (except lint). Regression analyses was used to model nutrient uptake as a function of both days after planting (DAP) and heat units after planting (HUAP). Regression analyses indicated that HUAP was equally good, and in most cases superior to using DAP to model total nutrient uptake and partitioning within both Upland and Pima cotton. In every case there was close agreement between the predicted and actual total nutrient uptake. For Upland cotton the actual total N, P, and K uptake was 199, 29, and 250 kg ha⁻¹ and the predicted total N, P, and K uptake was 199, 29, and 255 kg ha⁻¹, respectively. For Pima cotton the actual total N, P, and K uptake was 196, 29, and 215 kg ha⁻¹ and the predicted was 210, 29, and 229 kg ha⁻¹, respectively. The pattern of nutrient partitioning in Upland cotton were similar to the findings of others and Pima showed the same general patterns of partitioning as Upland cotton. Seeds were a major sink of nutrients. Nutrient uptake in seeds resulted in decreasing uptake in leaves and stems. Presumably, due to mobilization of nutrients from those parts to the seeds during seed development. The nutrient requirements to produce 100 kg lint ha' for Upland cotton was 15, 2.2, and 19 kg ha⁻¹ for N, P, and K, respectively and was 20, 3.0, and 22 kg ha⁻¹, respectively for Pima cotton.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Soil fertilityen_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Soil managementen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/209649-
dc.relation.ispartofseries370096en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSeries P-96en_US
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