Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/209598
Title:
The Effect of Night Temperature on Cotton Reproductive Development
Author:
Zeiher, Carolyn A.; Brown, Paul W.; Silvertooth, Jeffrey C.; Matumba, Nkonko; Mitton, Nancy
Issue Date:
Mar-1994
Publisher:
College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Cotton: A College of Agriculture Report
Abstract:
A field study was initiated in the summer of 1993 to investigate the effect of increased night temperatures on cotton reproductive development. DPL 5415 was planted on May 10. Treatments consisted of two temperature regimes placed in a completely randomized design with four replications. The two temperature treatments were initiated at first bloom and treatments terminated after 6 weeks. Cotton grown under ambient night temperature served as the control treatments while plants where the infrared radiation balance was modified to increase the nighttime foliage temperature served as the high night temperature treatment. This study showed that increasing the nighttime foliage temperature of cotton reduced vegetative dry matter production, plant height, and fruit retention. The photosynthetic capacity of the two treatments was not significantly different, suggesting that increased respiration at these higher nighttime foliage temperatures may be responsible for the reduction in assimilated carbon which contributed to the poor fruit retention.
Keywords:
Agriculture -- Arizona; Cotton -- Arizona; Cotton -- Physiology; Cotton -- Growth regulators
Series/Report no.:
370096; Series P-96

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleThe Effect of Night Temperature on Cotton Reproductive Developmenten_US
dc.contributor.authorZeiher, Carolyn A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Paul W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSilvertooth, Jeffrey C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMatumba, Nkonkoen_US
dc.contributor.authorMitton, Nancyen_US
dc.date.issued1994-03-
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.identifier.journalCotton: A College of Agriculture Reporten_US
dc.description.abstractA field study was initiated in the summer of 1993 to investigate the effect of increased night temperatures on cotton reproductive development. DPL 5415 was planted on May 10. Treatments consisted of two temperature regimes placed in a completely randomized design with four replications. The two temperature treatments were initiated at first bloom and treatments terminated after 6 weeks. Cotton grown under ambient night temperature served as the control treatments while plants where the infrared radiation balance was modified to increase the nighttime foliage temperature served as the high night temperature treatment. This study showed that increasing the nighttime foliage temperature of cotton reduced vegetative dry matter production, plant height, and fruit retention. The photosynthetic capacity of the two treatments was not significantly different, suggesting that increased respiration at these higher nighttime foliage temperatures may be responsible for the reduction in assimilated carbon which contributed to the poor fruit retention.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Physiologyen_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Growth regulatorsen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/209598-
dc.relation.ispartofseries370096en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSeries P-96en_US
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