Sweetpotato Whitefly Preference and Performance on Medium Maturity Cotton Varieties in Arizona

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/209576
Title:
Sweetpotato Whitefly Preference and Performance on Medium Maturity Cotton Varieties in Arizona
Author:
Ellsworth, P. C.; Meade, D. L.; Husman, S. H.; Ramsey, C. S.; Silvertooth, J. C.; Malcuit, J. E.
Issue Date:
Mar-1993
Publisher:
College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Cotton: A College of Agriculture Report
Abstract:
In conjunction with the 1992 cotton variety testing program (see Silvertooth 1993), 12 medium maturity varieties were evaluated for the presence of sweetpotato whitefli.es (SPWF). Three sites (Queen Creek, Maricopa, Coolidge) were selected for expression of a full range of infestation intensity. Total immatures per square inch ranged from less than 8 up to more than 8(X), depending on site, sample date and variety. The results indicated that there were significant effects of variety on SPWF numbers; however, the ranking of varieties was not always the same nor significant. Most varieties performed comparably, but one consistently had more SPWFs than the remaining varieties (chi 1 35). Comparative results from the three sites indicate that there may be separate preference and performance components which lead to the development of an infestation. Lea f hairiness was quantified front samples at one site, and the relationship of this factor to whitefly susceptibility is discussed. Two varieties, cb1135 and stv453, were found to be significantly more hairy than the remaining varieties. The results provided here represent a preliminary evaluation of the data. Further analyses will attempt to relate various crop production and agronomic factors to SPWF susceptibility (e.g., plant height, fruit retention, height:node ratio, canopy closure, growth habit, maturity, yield, crop protection regimen). One fact was clear, however. None of the varieties evaluated here demonstrated resistance to SPWFs and certainly not to the extent that a producer could eliminate substantial risk of infestation through variety selection.
Keywords:
Agriculture -- Arizona; Cotton -- Arizona; Cotton -- Insect investigations
Series/Report no.:
370094; Series P-94

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleSweetpotato Whitefly Preference and Performance on Medium Maturity Cotton Varieties in Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.authorEllsworth, P. C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMeade, D. L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHusman, S. H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRamsey, C. S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSilvertooth, J. C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMalcuit, J. E.en_US
dc.date.issued1993-03-
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.identifier.journalCotton: A College of Agriculture Reporten_US
dc.description.abstractIn conjunction with the 1992 cotton variety testing program (see Silvertooth 1993), 12 medium maturity varieties were evaluated for the presence of sweetpotato whitefli.es (SPWF). Three sites (Queen Creek, Maricopa, Coolidge) were selected for expression of a full range of infestation intensity. Total immatures per square inch ranged from less than 8 up to more than 8(X), depending on site, sample date and variety. The results indicated that there were significant effects of variety on SPWF numbers; however, the ranking of varieties was not always the same nor significant. Most varieties performed comparably, but one consistently had more SPWFs than the remaining varieties (chi 1 35). Comparative results from the three sites indicate that there may be separate preference and performance components which lead to the development of an infestation. Lea f hairiness was quantified front samples at one site, and the relationship of this factor to whitefly susceptibility is discussed. Two varieties, cb1135 and stv453, were found to be significantly more hairy than the remaining varieties. The results provided here represent a preliminary evaluation of the data. Further analyses will attempt to relate various crop production and agronomic factors to SPWF susceptibility (e.g., plant height, fruit retention, height:node ratio, canopy closure, growth habit, maturity, yield, crop protection regimen). One fact was clear, however. None of the varieties evaluated here demonstrated resistance to SPWFs and certainly not to the extent that a producer could eliminate substantial risk of infestation through variety selection.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Insect investigationsen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/209576-
dc.relation.ispartofseries370094en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSeries P-94en_US
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