Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/208649
Title:
Seasonal Dynamica of Sweetpotato Whitefly
Author:
Watson, T. F.; Silvertooth, J. C.
Issue Date:
Feb-1992
Publisher:
College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Cotton: A College of Agriculture Report
Abstract:
The sweet potato whitefly (SPWF) Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius). has become a serious problem of a number of agricultural crops in the southern tier of states in the U.S. In the southwestern U.S. it seriously affects summer crops such as melons and cotton, and fall, winter and spring vegetable crops such as lettuce, broccoli and cauliflower. Since this insect has no overwintering resting stage a succession of host plants is necessary in order to span the gap from cotton season to cotton season. This study characterized seasonal population trends of SPWF in cotton and then identified subsequent hosts which were important in the overwintering survival of this insect. The "off-season" hosts included certain weeds as well as cultivated crops and all appear to be important in the seasonal population dynamics of this whitefly.
Keywords:
Agriculture -- Arizona; Cotton -- Arizona; Cotton -- Insect investigations
Series/Report no.:
370091; Series P-91

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleSeasonal Dynamica of Sweetpotato Whiteflyen_US
dc.contributor.authorWatson, T. F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSilvertooth, J. C.en_US
dc.date.issued1992-02-
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.identifier.journalCotton: A College of Agriculture Reporten_US
dc.description.abstractThe sweet potato whitefly (SPWF) Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius). has become a serious problem of a number of agricultural crops in the southern tier of states in the U.S. In the southwestern U.S. it seriously affects summer crops such as melons and cotton, and fall, winter and spring vegetable crops such as lettuce, broccoli and cauliflower. Since this insect has no overwintering resting stage a succession of host plants is necessary in order to span the gap from cotton season to cotton season. This study characterized seasonal population trends of SPWF in cotton and then identified subsequent hosts which were important in the overwintering survival of this insect. The "off-season" hosts included certain weeds as well as cultivated crops and all appear to be important in the seasonal population dynamics of this whitefly.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Insect investigationsen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/208649-
dc.relation.ispartofseries370091en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSeries P-91en_US
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