Fat Content and Reproductive Condition of Migrating and Dispausing Boll Weevils in South Carolina and Arizona

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/208609
Title:
Fat Content and Reproductive Condition of Migrating and Dispausing Boll Weevils in South Carolina and Arizona
Author:
Leggett, J. E.
Affiliation:
USDA-ARS-Western Cotton Research Laboratory
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Cotton: A College of Agriculture Report
Abstract:
Overwintered female boll weevils, Anthonomus grandis Boheman, collected in grandlure- baited traps were significantly leaner than weevils taken from winter habitat. Weevils that emerged from naturally infested cotton bolls tended to be fat as adults regardless of subsequent adult diet, but adult diet can affect gonadal development. Weevils that emerged from bolls in 1975 in South Carolina had a higher winter survival rate and emerged from winter habitat earlier than the total population. Migrant weevils appear to be mainly colonizers that have some body fat and medium size gonads. The physiological condition of migrants was fairly consistent over time and location in South Carolina but not in Arizona. The time of migratory flight was related mainly to plant maturity and population levels in South Carolina. Weevils collected from cotton plants in South Carolina and Arizona had significantly more body fat than weevils trapped at the cotton field but oogenesis was variable between the two locations.
Keywords:
Agriculture -- Arizona; Cotton -- Arizona; Cotton -- Insect investigations
Series/Report no.:
370087; Series P-87

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.titleFat Content and Reproductive Condition of Migrating and Dispausing Boll Weevils in South Carolina and Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeggett, J. E.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentUSDA-ARS-Western Cotton Research Laboratoryen_US
dc.date.issued1991-
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.identifier.journalCotton: A College of Agriculture Reporten_US
dc.description.abstractOverwintered female boll weevils, Anthonomus grandis Boheman, collected in grandlure- baited traps were significantly leaner than weevils taken from winter habitat. Weevils that emerged from naturally infested cotton bolls tended to be fat as adults regardless of subsequent adult diet, but adult diet can affect gonadal development. Weevils that emerged from bolls in 1975 in South Carolina had a higher winter survival rate and emerged from winter habitat earlier than the total population. Migrant weevils appear to be mainly colonizers that have some body fat and medium size gonads. The physiological condition of migrants was fairly consistent over time and location in South Carolina but not in Arizona. The time of migratory flight was related mainly to plant maturity and population levels in South Carolina. Weevils collected from cotton plants in South Carolina and Arizona had significantly more body fat than weevils trapped at the cotton field but oogenesis was variable between the two locations.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Insect investigationsen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/208609-
dc.relation.ispartofseries370087en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSeries P-87en_US
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