Examining Trends in Post-Disturbance Ecosystem Dynamics in the Southwestern United States and Northwestern Mexico Using Remote Sensing Time-Series Data and Land Cover Change Detection

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/205420
Title:
Examining Trends in Post-Disturbance Ecosystem Dynamics in the Southwestern United States and Northwestern Mexico Using Remote Sensing Time-Series Data and Land Cover Change Detection
Author:
Romo Leon, Jose Raul
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Embargo: Release after 12/05/2012
Abstract:
New forms of disturbance, and alteration of current disturbance regimes in arid and semiarid ecosystems, have resulted in the modification and degradation of large regions. This research explores vegetation response as a consequence of two different disturbance events in the southwestern US and northwestern Mexico. This topic was explored in this dissertation utilizing remotely sensed geospatial information in three separate studies.The first study explores the development of methods to assess the effectiveness of pre-fire restoration efforts, by evaluating vegetation response as a function of local environmental variables. Here I evaluated three fire locations at Bandelier National Monument (New Mexico). My models explain post-fire vegetation response as a function of environmental inputs and pre-fire site conditions (restored, unrestored and control areas). However, further analysis will be needed to better understand the effect of pre-fire restoration techniques on post-fire vegetation response.My second study explores the development of monitoring practices using remotely sensed data to assess land cover dynamics through time. The study area was the arid agro-ecosystem of La Costa de Hermosillo (LCH) in northwestern Mexico. My results show a continuous tendency towards a decrease in agriculture from 1988 until 2009. Detailed change detection demonstrates high rates of change from agriculture to other land cover classes in areas with dense agricultural developments. Implementation of these monitoring protocols would help with the application of restoration practices.The third study we used remote sensing time series data to assess phenological trends and variability among land cover types in relation to climatic variability within communities present in a heavily impacted agro-ecosystem (LCH). My analysis comprised three different agricultural land cover types including abandoned agricultural fields, and four additional natural land cover classes. I found that productivity has not increased in abandoned fields (since abandonment). Furthermore, I found that the models developed in this study significantly explain phenological variability as a function of climatic variability.These studies suggest that the use of remote sensing tools could effectively contribute to our ability to monitor vegetation dynamics in arid ecosystems. The implementation of methodologies generated in this work would significantly inform managers in decision making processes.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Land Cover Change; Remote Sensing; Restoration; Vegetation Dynamics; Natural Resources; Degradation; Disturbance
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Natural Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
van Leeuwen, Willem Jan Dirk

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleExamining Trends in Post-Disturbance Ecosystem Dynamics in the Southwestern United States and Northwestern Mexico Using Remote Sensing Time-Series Data and Land Cover Change Detectionen_US
dc.creatorRomo Leon, Jose Raulen_US
dc.contributor.authorRomo Leon, Jose Raulen_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseEmbargo: Release after 12/05/2012en_US
dc.description.abstractNew forms of disturbance, and alteration of current disturbance regimes in arid and semiarid ecosystems, have resulted in the modification and degradation of large regions. This research explores vegetation response as a consequence of two different disturbance events in the southwestern US and northwestern Mexico. This topic was explored in this dissertation utilizing remotely sensed geospatial information in three separate studies.The first study explores the development of methods to assess the effectiveness of pre-fire restoration efforts, by evaluating vegetation response as a function of local environmental variables. Here I evaluated three fire locations at Bandelier National Monument (New Mexico). My models explain post-fire vegetation response as a function of environmental inputs and pre-fire site conditions (restored, unrestored and control areas). However, further analysis will be needed to better understand the effect of pre-fire restoration techniques on post-fire vegetation response.My second study explores the development of monitoring practices using remotely sensed data to assess land cover dynamics through time. The study area was the arid agro-ecosystem of La Costa de Hermosillo (LCH) in northwestern Mexico. My results show a continuous tendency towards a decrease in agriculture from 1988 until 2009. Detailed change detection demonstrates high rates of change from agriculture to other land cover classes in areas with dense agricultural developments. Implementation of these monitoring protocols would help with the application of restoration practices.The third study we used remote sensing time series data to assess phenological trends and variability among land cover types in relation to climatic variability within communities present in a heavily impacted agro-ecosystem (LCH). My analysis comprised three different agricultural land cover types including abandoned agricultural fields, and four additional natural land cover classes. I found that productivity has not increased in abandoned fields (since abandonment). Furthermore, I found that the models developed in this study significantly explain phenological variability as a function of climatic variability.These studies suggest that the use of remote sensing tools could effectively contribute to our ability to monitor vegetation dynamics in arid ecosystems. The implementation of methodologies generated in this work would significantly inform managers in decision making processes.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectLand Cover Changeen_US
dc.subjectRemote Sensingen_US
dc.subjectRestorationen_US
dc.subjectVegetation Dynamicsen_US
dc.subjectNatural Resourcesen_US
dc.subjectDegradationen_US
dc.subjectDisturbanceen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNatural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorvan Leeuwen, Willem Jan Dirken_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMarsh, Stuart E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcClaran, Mitchel P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGuertin, David Phillipen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCastellanos Villegas, Alejandro E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeemembervan Leeuwen, Willem Jan Dirken_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.