Maintaining Copper Homeostasis - Molecular Studies on Bacterial Copper Transporters

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/205232
Title:
Maintaining Copper Homeostasis - Molecular Studies on Bacterial Copper Transporters
Author:
Kim, Eun-Hae
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Embargo: Release after 11/18/2013
Abstract:
Bacteria have evolved sophisticated cellular transport mechanisms to maintain metal homeostasis to not only utilize metals as important cofactors but also to evade the toxicity of these ions. The delicate balance is maintained by several homeostatic mechanisms that range from active cytoplasmic export, modification, sequestration, and periplasmic detoxification of toxic metals to the extracellular milieu. One mechanism involves active periplasmic extrusion of toxic substrates via a transmembrane spanning tripartite protein complex. The mechanism of substrate binding and subsequent efflux has yet to be elucidated. However, genetic, comparative genomic, biochemical, and functional analyses of the components of the heavy-metal efflux family have allowed the development of proposed models for a substrate transport pathway. The goals of this research were to identify the roles these systems play and to further characterize these systems on a molecular level to ultimately understand the mechanism of substrate transport. Elucidating a transport pathway in metal transporters allows for the development of a revised working model, which ultimately can have implications for antimicrobial drug development.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
HME; metal; RND; transporters; Soil, Water & Environmental Science; copper; efflux
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Soil, Water & Environmental Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
McEvoy, Megan M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleMaintaining Copper Homeostasis - Molecular Studies on Bacterial Copper Transportersen_US
dc.creatorKim, Eun-Haeen_US
dc.contributor.authorKim, Eun-Haeen_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseEmbargo: Release after 11/18/2013en_US
dc.description.abstractBacteria have evolved sophisticated cellular transport mechanisms to maintain metal homeostasis to not only utilize metals as important cofactors but also to evade the toxicity of these ions. The delicate balance is maintained by several homeostatic mechanisms that range from active cytoplasmic export, modification, sequestration, and periplasmic detoxification of toxic metals to the extracellular milieu. One mechanism involves active periplasmic extrusion of toxic substrates via a transmembrane spanning tripartite protein complex. The mechanism of substrate binding and subsequent efflux has yet to be elucidated. However, genetic, comparative genomic, biochemical, and functional analyses of the components of the heavy-metal efflux family have allowed the development of proposed models for a substrate transport pathway. The goals of this research were to identify the roles these systems play and to further characterize these systems on a molecular level to ultimately understand the mechanism of substrate transport. Elucidating a transport pathway in metal transporters allows for the development of a revised working model, which ultimately can have implications for antimicrobial drug development.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectHMEen_US
dc.subjectmetalen_US
dc.subjectRNDen_US
dc.subjecttransportersen_US
dc.subjectSoil, Water & Environmental Scienceen_US
dc.subjectcopperen_US
dc.subjecteffluxen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSoil, Water & Environmental Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMcEvoy, Megan M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGerba, Charlesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSo, Magdaleneen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcEvoy, Megan M.en_US
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