THE EFFICACY OF NATURAL PLANT ANTIMICROBIALS AGAINST ESCHERICHIA COLI

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/205215
Title:
THE EFFICACY OF NATURAL PLANT ANTIMICROBIALS AGAINST ESCHERICHIA COLI
Author:
Gilling, Damian Henry
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Embargo: Release after 09/28/2013
Abstract:
The number of foodborne disease outbreaks related to fresh produce has increased in recent years. This has coincided with a growing public demand for minimally processed fruits and vegetables. Effective produce sanitizers are therefore needed that are at least as effective as chlorine, currently the most commonly used sanitizer. Natural antimicrobials from plant extracts and essential oils are a possible alternative. These are highly effective and may also be used in situations in which chlorine is not advantageous; for instance, in situations in which chlorine has limited efficacy or because of concerns over the production of harmful by-products resulting from chlorine use. Plant derived essential oils have been shown to be antibacterial, antiviral, and antifungal. In this study we examined the use of natural antimicrobials from plant extracts and essential oils as possible alternative sanitizers. We examined these antimicrobials for their efficacy against Escherichia coli. In addition, since many of these natural compounds are believed to be membrane active, silver ions were added to some of the tests to assess the potential for synergy between the antimicrobials. Silver ions, although slow-acting on their own, often exhibit a synergistic antimicrobial effect when combined with other membrane active antimicrobials such as oxidizing agents. These studies reveal that plant derived antimicrobials are effective sanitizers with the potential to replace commonly used chlorine
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Essential Oils; Microbiology; Antimicrobials; Escherichia coli
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Microbiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Gerba, Charles

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTHE EFFICACY OF NATURAL PLANT ANTIMICROBIALS AGAINST ESCHERICHIA COLIen_US
dc.creatorGilling, Damian Henryen_US
dc.contributor.authorGilling, Damian Henryen_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseEmbargo: Release after 09/28/2013en_US
dc.description.abstractThe number of foodborne disease outbreaks related to fresh produce has increased in recent years. This has coincided with a growing public demand for minimally processed fruits and vegetables. Effective produce sanitizers are therefore needed that are at least as effective as chlorine, currently the most commonly used sanitizer. Natural antimicrobials from plant extracts and essential oils are a possible alternative. These are highly effective and may also be used in situations in which chlorine is not advantageous; for instance, in situations in which chlorine has limited efficacy or because of concerns over the production of harmful by-products resulting from chlorine use. Plant derived essential oils have been shown to be antibacterial, antiviral, and antifungal. In this study we examined the use of natural antimicrobials from plant extracts and essential oils as possible alternative sanitizers. We examined these antimicrobials for their efficacy against Escherichia coli. In addition, since many of these natural compounds are believed to be membrane active, silver ions were added to some of the tests to assess the potential for synergy between the antimicrobials. Silver ions, although slow-acting on their own, often exhibit a synergistic antimicrobial effect when combined with other membrane active antimicrobials such as oxidizing agents. These studies reveal that plant derived antimicrobials are effective sanitizers with the potential to replace commonly used chlorineen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectEssential Oilsen_US
dc.subjectMicrobiologyen_US
dc.subjectAntimicrobialsen_US
dc.subjectEscherichia colien_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMicrobiologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGerba, Charlesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJoens, Lynnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRavishankar, Sadhanaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMatthias, Allanen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBright, Kellyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGerba, Charlesen_US
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