A Biosensor Approach for the Detection of Active Virus Using FTIR Spectroscopy and Cell Culture

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/204913
Title:
A Biosensor Approach for the Detection of Active Virus Using FTIR Spectroscopy and Cell Culture
Author:
Lee Montiel, Felipe Tadeo
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Embargo: Release after 02/05/2012
Abstract:
Worldwide, 3.575 million people die each year from water-related diseases. The water and sanitation crisis claims more lives than any warfare and is predicted to be one of the biggest global challenges of this century. The rapid, accurate detection of viral pathogens from environmental samples is an ongoing and pertinent challenge in biological engineering. Currently employed methods are lacking in either efficiency or specificity. Here we explore a novel method for virus detection and concurrently use this method to learn more about the very early stages of the virus infection process. The method combines Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, a method of visualizing molecules based on changes in vibration of particles, and mammalian cells as the biosensor. This method is used to detect and investigate viruses from the family picornaviridae, chosen due to their public health burden and their widespread presence in environmental samples, especially water sources. This family includes the Polioviruses, echoviruses and Coxsackieviruses, among others, many of which are human pathogens.The research outlined in this dissertation is aimed at developing and implementing a new cell-based biosensor that combines the advantages of FTIR spectroscopy with the ability of buffalo green monkey kidney (BGMK) cells to sense diverse stimuli, including infective enteroviruses. The goal of developing this biosensor is outlined in the first paper. The second paper focuses on the application of advanced statistical methods to analyze the spectra to discriminate different viral infections in BGMK cells. Finally, we designed a non-reactive metal biochamber to use with attenuated total reflectance-FTIR. This allowed near-continuous acquisition of real-time spectral data for the study of biochemical changes in mammalian cells caused by poliovirus (PV1) infection. This system is capable of tracking changes in cell biochemistry in minute intervals for many hours at a time.This work demonstrates the feasibility of FTIR spectroscopy in combination with the broad sensitivity of mammalian cells for potential use in the detection of infective viruses from environmental samples. We envision this method being extended to high throughput, automated systems to screen for viruses or other toxins in drinking water systems and medical applications.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Enterovirus; FTIR spectroscopy; PCA; PLS; Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering; BGMK cells; cell-based biosensor
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Riley, Mark R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleA Biosensor Approach for the Detection of Active Virus Using FTIR Spectroscopy and Cell Cultureen_US
dc.creatorLee Montiel, Felipe Tadeoen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee Montiel, Felipe Tadeoen_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseEmbargo: Release after 02/05/2012en_US
dc.description.abstractWorldwide, 3.575 million people die each year from water-related diseases. The water and sanitation crisis claims more lives than any warfare and is predicted to be one of the biggest global challenges of this century. The rapid, accurate detection of viral pathogens from environmental samples is an ongoing and pertinent challenge in biological engineering. Currently employed methods are lacking in either efficiency or specificity. Here we explore a novel method for virus detection and concurrently use this method to learn more about the very early stages of the virus infection process. The method combines Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, a method of visualizing molecules based on changes in vibration of particles, and mammalian cells as the biosensor. This method is used to detect and investigate viruses from the family picornaviridae, chosen due to their public health burden and their widespread presence in environmental samples, especially water sources. This family includes the Polioviruses, echoviruses and Coxsackieviruses, among others, many of which are human pathogens.The research outlined in this dissertation is aimed at developing and implementing a new cell-based biosensor that combines the advantages of FTIR spectroscopy with the ability of buffalo green monkey kidney (BGMK) cells to sense diverse stimuli, including infective enteroviruses. The goal of developing this biosensor is outlined in the first paper. The second paper focuses on the application of advanced statistical methods to analyze the spectra to discriminate different viral infections in BGMK cells. Finally, we designed a non-reactive metal biochamber to use with attenuated total reflectance-FTIR. This allowed near-continuous acquisition of real-time spectral data for the study of biochemical changes in mammalian cells caused by poliovirus (PV1) infection. This system is capable of tracking changes in cell biochemistry in minute intervals for many hours at a time.This work demonstrates the feasibility of FTIR spectroscopy in combination with the broad sensitivity of mammalian cells for potential use in the detection of infective viruses from environmental samples. We envision this method being extended to high throughput, automated systems to screen for viruses or other toxins in drinking water systems and medical applications.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectEnterovirusen_US
dc.subjectFTIR spectroscopyen_US
dc.subjectPCAen_US
dc.subjectPLSen_US
dc.subjectAgricultural & Biosystems Engineeringen_US
dc.subjectBGMK cellsen_US
dc.subjectcell-based biosensoren_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAgricultural & Biosystems Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRiley, Mark R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberReynolds, Kellyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberYoon, Jeong-Yeolen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAn, Linglingen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCuello, Joelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRiley, Mark R.en_US
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