La Violencia Adentro (Violence in the Interior): Gender Violence, Human Rights, and State-Community-NGO Relations in Coastal Ecuador

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/204890
Title:
La Violencia Adentro (Violence in the Interior): Gender Violence, Human Rights, and State-Community-NGO Relations in Coastal Ecuador
Author:
Friederic, Karin
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Embargo: Release after 08/01/2013
Abstract:
Building on research conducted over the last ten years, this dissertation explores how local understandings and manifestations of gender violence are changing as women and men learn about human rights and gain access to state-based forms of justice. Wife abuse in coastal Ecuador is often explained as a result of machismo and an enduring culture of violence. I challenge this conception by demonstrating how political, economic and social processes normalize gender violence, and by showing how transnational human rights discourses are reshaping gender relations, structures of impunity, and the visibility of particular forms of violence. Inhabitants in this historically marginalized region are using alliances with transnational NGOs to negotiate their relationship to the state. Human rights, transnational alliances, and improved access to justice offer powerful openings for local women and families, but their empowering potential is delimited by growing social and economic vulnerability and the discrepancies between rights-based subjectivities and preexisting understandings of the self. Ultimately, I argue that human rights - as concept, as practice, and as discourse - reorganize power in ways that warrant both optimism and critique.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
gender; human rights; suffering; violence; Anthropology; Ecuador; feminism
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Green, Linda B.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleLa Violencia Adentro (Violence in the Interior): Gender Violence, Human Rights, and State-Community-NGO Relations in Coastal Ecuadoren_US
dc.creatorFriederic, Karinen_US
dc.contributor.authorFriederic, Karinen_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseEmbargo: Release after 08/01/2013en_US
dc.description.abstractBuilding on research conducted over the last ten years, this dissertation explores how local understandings and manifestations of gender violence are changing as women and men learn about human rights and gain access to state-based forms of justice. Wife abuse in coastal Ecuador is often explained as a result of machismo and an enduring culture of violence. I challenge this conception by demonstrating how political, economic and social processes normalize gender violence, and by showing how transnational human rights discourses are reshaping gender relations, structures of impunity, and the visibility of particular forms of violence. Inhabitants in this historically marginalized region are using alliances with transnational NGOs to negotiate their relationship to the state. Human rights, transnational alliances, and improved access to justice offer powerful openings for local women and families, but their empowering potential is delimited by growing social and economic vulnerability and the discrepancies between rights-based subjectivities and preexisting understandings of the self. Ultimately, I argue that human rights - as concept, as practice, and as discourse - reorganize power in ways that warrant both optimism and critique.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectgenderen_US
dc.subjecthuman rightsen_US
dc.subjectsufferingen_US
dc.subjectviolenceen_US
dc.subjectAnthropologyen_US
dc.subjectEcuadoren_US
dc.subjectfeminismen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGreen, Linda B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNichter, Marken_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBriggs, Lauraen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFew, Marthaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMerry, Sally Engleen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGreen, Linda B.en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.