SELF CONTROL AND MOTIVATION IN YOUNG ADULTS WITH VARYING LEVELS OF IMPULSIVITY: A DIMENSIONAL APPROACH

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/204302
Title:
SELF CONTROL AND MOTIVATION IN YOUNG ADULTS WITH VARYING LEVELS OF IMPULSIVITY: A DIMENSIONAL APPROACH
Author:
Putnam, Karen Haas
Issue Date:
2011
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Embargo: Release after 5/6/2013
Abstract:
The purpose of this research project is to better understand how self-control and motivation play a role in impulsive behavior as observed in AD/HD. Symptoms of impulsivity in AD/HD have been associated with poor self-control (e.g., Barkley, 1997, Willcutt, Pennington &Ozonoff, 2005), and also with an unusual sensitivity to rewards such as money (e.g., Douglas, 1999; Solanto et al., 2001, Sonuga-Barke et al., 2003). We know that self-control and motivation develop with age and play a key role in several clinical conditions involving poor impulse control, yet little is known about the interaction between these two fundamental processes. We are interested in studying these processes in interaction with one another and in relation to AD/HD symptoms. Neuropsychological studies reveal that executive function (EF) deficits do not fully explain AD/HD and its symptoms, as EF deficits have only accounted for less than 50% of the variance of AD/HD symptoms (Castellanos et al, 2006). While the impairment of response inhibition is the most reliable EF impairment in studies to date (Willcutt et al, 2005), motivation and reward processing deficits seem to coexist independent of these deficits (Luman, 2006, Sagvolden, 2006; Solanto et al., 2001). These findings have led researchers to develop the "dual pathway" hypothesis that incorporates both executive dysfunction of response inhibition as well as motivational deficits (Sonuga-Barke, 2002). The aim of this project is to further our understanding of how the interplay of these processes may be related to impulsivity and how they impact and result in certain "real world" behaviors. One interesting feature of this project is the development of new tasks that are capable of assessing both individual pathways ("topdown"/ executive function and "bottom-up"/motivation) and their interaction within the task itself. This lends not only to the strength of the design, but reflects the most current research trends in the field and makes a unique contribution as well.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Scheres, Anouk P. J.; Allen, John J.B.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSELF CONTROL AND MOTIVATION IN YOUNG ADULTS WITH VARYING LEVELS OF IMPULSIVITY: A DIMENSIONAL APPROACHen_US
dc.creatorPutnam, Karen Haasen_US
dc.contributor.authorPutnam, Karen Haasen_US
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseEmbargo: Release after 5/6/2013en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this research project is to better understand how self-control and motivation play a role in impulsive behavior as observed in AD/HD. Symptoms of impulsivity in AD/HD have been associated with poor self-control (e.g., Barkley, 1997, Willcutt, Pennington &Ozonoff, 2005), and also with an unusual sensitivity to rewards such as money (e.g., Douglas, 1999; Solanto et al., 2001, Sonuga-Barke et al., 2003). We know that self-control and motivation develop with age and play a key role in several clinical conditions involving poor impulse control, yet little is known about the interaction between these two fundamental processes. We are interested in studying these processes in interaction with one another and in relation to AD/HD symptoms. Neuropsychological studies reveal that executive function (EF) deficits do not fully explain AD/HD and its symptoms, as EF deficits have only accounted for less than 50% of the variance of AD/HD symptoms (Castellanos et al, 2006). While the impairment of response inhibition is the most reliable EF impairment in studies to date (Willcutt et al, 2005), motivation and reward processing deficits seem to coexist independent of these deficits (Luman, 2006, Sagvolden, 2006; Solanto et al., 2001). These findings have led researchers to develop the "dual pathway" hypothesis that incorporates both executive dysfunction of response inhibition as well as motivational deficits (Sonuga-Barke, 2002). The aim of this project is to further our understanding of how the interplay of these processes may be related to impulsivity and how they impact and result in certain "real world" behaviors. One interesting feature of this project is the development of new tasks that are capable of assessing both individual pathways ("topdown"/ executive function and "bottom-up"/motivation) and their interaction within the task itself. This lends not only to the strength of the design, but reflects the most current research trends in the field and makes a unique contribution as well.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorScheres, Anouk P. J.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorAllen, John J.B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBootzin, Richard R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNadel, Lynnen_US
dc.identifier.proquest11590-
dc.identifier.oclc752261452-
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