A Marine Reserve and Household Nexus: Chilean Livelihood Adaptations at Four Sites in the Coquimbo and Atacama Regions.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/204297
Title:
A Marine Reserve and Household Nexus: Chilean Livelihood Adaptations at Four Sites in the Coquimbo and Atacama Regions.
Author:
Qashu, Susan
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Embargo: Release after 10/1/2012
Abstract:
How do households in an arid coastal zone adapt to a national marine reserve, national park, and tourism development while sustaining their traditional livelihood practices? Policies from this Marine Protected Area (MPA), compounded by drought, possible coal power plant construction, and limited resource access, threaten rural fishing households throughout Chile. To date, little research has been conducted on how these multiple external pressures shape women and men's household roles and their livelihood practices. I am studying 1) how women and men's household decisions in the rural Chilean communities of Los Choros, Punta de Choros, Chañaral de Aceituno, and Carrizalillo change with current social and environmental pressures; and 2) how these decisions affect the way women and men, and their households, interact with Pingüino de Humboldt National Reserve and Isla Choros, Isla Damas, and Isla Chañaral Marine Reserve. This longitudinal study, from September 2007 to December 2009, uses a political ecology framework which applies mixed methods approaches to arrive at a cross-section of perspectives and experiences in the four communities. I discovered that women and men have diversified their traditional livelihoods as pastoralists, fishers and harvesters to include tourism operators and pragmatic activists.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Arid Lands Resource Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Hutchinson, Charles

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleA Marine Reserve and Household Nexus: Chilean Livelihood Adaptations at Four Sites in the Coquimbo and Atacama Regions.en_US
dc.creatorQashu, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.authorQashu, Susanen_US
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseEmbargo: Release after 10/1/2012en_US
dc.description.abstractHow do households in an arid coastal zone adapt to a national marine reserve, national park, and tourism development while sustaining their traditional livelihood practices? Policies from this Marine Protected Area (MPA), compounded by drought, possible coal power plant construction, and limited resource access, threaten rural fishing households throughout Chile. To date, little research has been conducted on how these multiple external pressures shape women and men's household roles and their livelihood practices. I am studying 1) how women and men's household decisions in the rural Chilean communities of Los Choros, Punta de Choros, Chañaral de Aceituno, and Carrizalillo change with current social and environmental pressures; and 2) how these decisions affect the way women and men, and their households, interact with Pingüino de Humboldt National Reserve and Isla Choros, Isla Damas, and Isla Chañaral Marine Reserve. This longitudinal study, from September 2007 to December 2009, uses a political ecology framework which applies mixed methods approaches to arrive at a cross-section of perspectives and experiences in the four communities. I discovered that women and men have diversified their traditional livelihoods as pastoralists, fishers and harvesters to include tourism operators and pragmatic activists.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineArid Lands Resource Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHutchinson, Charlesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGimblett, Randyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBonine, Michaelen_US
dc.identifier.proquest11255-
dc.identifier.oclc752261101-
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