Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/204295
Title:
FLEXIBLE MANIPULATORS: MODELING, ANALYSIS AND OPTIMUM DESIGNS
Author:
Gao, Yanqing
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Dissertation not available (per author's request)
Abstract:
Lightweight robotic manipulators play important roles in many applications, such as construction automation, environmental applications, and space engineering. Due to the complexity of the link deformation, the research effort on accurate modeling and high performance control has increased dramatically in recent years. Very few studies with quantitative results have been reported in the literature on the effect of size, shape, mass distribution, tip load, and other factors on the dynamics and operational performance of flexible manipulators. However, such analyses are critical to the effectiveness of any model for optimization and control purposes. The objective of this dissertation is to provide a unified approach that simultaneously considers all factors in mechanical, electrical, sensing, and control components to address modeling, analysis, optimization, and control of flexible manipulators. A systematic study of various models and comparison their pros and cons with respect to specific design and control problems are developed. Those critical factors mentioned above are addressed with systematic but specific numerical investigations based on the current available dynamic models. Two conventional dual optimal design problems have been well studied in our previous studies. To make those designs useful, complicated constraints that are encountered in reality must be included. In most of those cases, analytical procedures developed before would no longer applicable. New methods for optimal design problems with meaningful constraints are looked into. The complexity of a manipulator system is due to the interrelation and interdependency of its subsystems, for example, its kinematic system control system, driver system, and measuring or sensing system. In traditional design, a manipulator's link structure is designed first, followed by its driver system, then a measuring system, and finally its control system. This leads to a sequential design process and a locally optimal solution, and therefore the potential of a flexible manipulator is rarely fully realized. To overcome such problems, a concurrent design procedure that integrates all subsystems must be under taken, that is, a mechatronic approach must be considered in the design of flexible manipulators.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Mining Geological & Geophysical Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Wang, Fei-Yue

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleFLEXIBLE MANIPULATORS: MODELING, ANALYSIS AND OPTIMUM DESIGNSen_US
dc.creatorGao, Yanqingen_US
dc.contributor.authorGao, Yanqingen_US
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseDissertation not available (per author's request)en_US
dc.description.abstractLightweight robotic manipulators play important roles in many applications, such as construction automation, environmental applications, and space engineering. Due to the complexity of the link deformation, the research effort on accurate modeling and high performance control has increased dramatically in recent years. Very few studies with quantitative results have been reported in the literature on the effect of size, shape, mass distribution, tip load, and other factors on the dynamics and operational performance of flexible manipulators. However, such analyses are critical to the effectiveness of any model for optimization and control purposes. The objective of this dissertation is to provide a unified approach that simultaneously considers all factors in mechanical, electrical, sensing, and control components to address modeling, analysis, optimization, and control of flexible manipulators. A systematic study of various models and comparison their pros and cons with respect to specific design and control problems are developed. Those critical factors mentioned above are addressed with systematic but specific numerical investigations based on the current available dynamic models. Two conventional dual optimal design problems have been well studied in our previous studies. To make those designs useful, complicated constraints that are encountered in reality must be included. In most of those cases, analytical procedures developed before would no longer applicable. New methods for optimal design problems with meaningful constraints are looked into. The complexity of a manipulator system is due to the interrelation and interdependency of its subsystems, for example, its kinematic system control system, driver system, and measuring or sensing system. In traditional design, a manipulator's link structure is designed first, followed by its driver system, then a measuring system, and finally its control system. This leads to a sequential design process and a locally optimal solution, and therefore the potential of a flexible manipulator is rarely fully realized. To overcome such problems, a concurrent design procedure that integrates all subsystems must be under taken, that is, a mechatronic approach must be considered in the design of flexible manipulators.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMining Geological & Geophysical Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWang, Fei-Yueen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPoulton, Mary M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSzidarovszky, Ferencen_US
dc.identifier.proquest11190-
dc.identifier.oclc752261041-
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