The Chiefs' Prophecy: The Destruction of "Original" Cheyenne Leadership During "the Critical Era" (1876-1935)

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/204273
Title:
The Chiefs' Prophecy: The Destruction of "Original" Cheyenne Leadership During "the Critical Era" (1876-1935)
Author:
Killsback, Leo Kevin
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Dissertation Not Available (per author's request)
Abstract:
Inconsistent modern tribal government political leadership standards are common throughout Indian Country. There is an urgent need to address the causes and effects of tribal political instability and the root of this instability which lies in the lack of leadership and the absence of a realistic leadership identity, specific to nations like the Northern Cheyenne. The modern concepts of tribal leadership are inconsistent, undefined, and if they do exist these concepts are incompatible with traditional Indian culture, spirituality, and community needs. Traditional Cheyenne concepts of leadership are rooted in the oral tradition and the Cheyenne ceremonial practices.This is a study of the Northern Cheyenne change in leadership concepts and the loss of traditional concepts of leadership during the time after their last armed resistance and before the establishment of the Northern Cheyenne Tribal Constitutional government. The history of Northern Cheyenne Nation is comprised of heroic triumphs and tragedies. Throughout this rich history, there have been spiritual and political leaders who have contributed to the survival of the Northern Cheyenne people. Leadership, from the perspective of the Cheyenne, and the traditional Cheyenne governing system were rooted in spiritual teachings, ceremonies, and sustained through serving the people. These ancient concepts of leadership allowed for stability. These traditional concepts were destroyed through colonization, and this led to political dysfunction.The goal of this study is to first identify the traditional concepts leadership, then identify the significant changes in these concepts of leadership to discuss how these changes have led to the current political instability of the Northern Cheyenne government. What were the major changes in traditional Cheyenne leadership and governance that occurred between 1876 and 1935? How did these changes in traditional leadership and governance occur? What traditional political, spiritual, and economic institutions of the Cheyenne were changed and how were they changed? What was Cheyenne leadership and governance like after the establishment of a reservation and after the establishment of an Indian Reorganization Act (IRA) constitutional government? What can the Northern Cheyenne people expect in the future of tribal leadership and government?
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Cheyenne-Indian; Indian-Leadership; Indigenous-Decolonization; Reorganization-Act; Traditional-Government; Tribal-Governance
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; American Indian Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Tapahonso, Luci

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Chiefs' Prophecy: The Destruction of "Original" Cheyenne Leadership During "the Critical Era" (1876-1935)en_US
dc.creatorKillsback, Leo Kevinen_US
dc.contributor.authorKillsback, Leo Kevinen_US
dc.date.issued2010en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseDissertation Not Available (per author's request)en_US
dc.description.abstractInconsistent modern tribal government political leadership standards are common throughout Indian Country. There is an urgent need to address the causes and effects of tribal political instability and the root of this instability which lies in the lack of leadership and the absence of a realistic leadership identity, specific to nations like the Northern Cheyenne. The modern concepts of tribal leadership are inconsistent, undefined, and if they do exist these concepts are incompatible with traditional Indian culture, spirituality, and community needs. Traditional Cheyenne concepts of leadership are rooted in the oral tradition and the Cheyenne ceremonial practices.This is a study of the Northern Cheyenne change in leadership concepts and the loss of traditional concepts of leadership during the time after their last armed resistance and before the establishment of the Northern Cheyenne Tribal Constitutional government. The history of Northern Cheyenne Nation is comprised of heroic triumphs and tragedies. Throughout this rich history, there have been spiritual and political leaders who have contributed to the survival of the Northern Cheyenne people. Leadership, from the perspective of the Cheyenne, and the traditional Cheyenne governing system were rooted in spiritual teachings, ceremonies, and sustained through serving the people. These ancient concepts of leadership allowed for stability. These traditional concepts were destroyed through colonization, and this led to political dysfunction.The goal of this study is to first identify the traditional concepts leadership, then identify the significant changes in these concepts of leadership to discuss how these changes have led to the current political instability of the Northern Cheyenne government. What were the major changes in traditional Cheyenne leadership and governance that occurred between 1876 and 1935? How did these changes in traditional leadership and governance occur? What traditional political, spiritual, and economic institutions of the Cheyenne were changed and how were they changed? What was Cheyenne leadership and governance like after the establishment of a reservation and after the establishment of an Indian Reorganization Act (IRA) constitutional government? What can the Northern Cheyenne people expect in the future of tribal leadership and government?en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectCheyenne-Indianen_US
dc.subjectIndian-Leadershipen_US
dc.subjectIndigenous-Decolonizationen_US
dc.subjectReorganization-Acten_US
dc.subjectTraditional-Governmenten_US
dc.subjectTribal-Governanceen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorTapahonso, Lucien_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAustin, Raymond D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHershey, Robert A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJoe, Jennieen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWilliams, Robert A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest10979en
dc.identifier.oclc659754900en
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